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Jeremy Noakes

An obsession with Aryanism and eugenic theory was the catalyst for Nazi policies of repression and extermination against gypsies and other ‘asocials’ – the forgotten victims of the Third Reich.

Fifty years ago this month, Adolf Hitler was appointed Reich Chancellor of Germany by the aging President Hindenburg. How were the Nazis able to 'seize power' in this way? Jeremy Noakes begins our special feature by explaining their success.

In his article last month in our series, 'Makers of the Twentieth Century', Jeremy Noakes evaluated Hitler's contribution to the creation of Nazi Germany and the outbreak of the Second World War. Now Dr. Noakes turns his attention to those who voted for the Nazis: from whom did the party of Hitler draw its support and what did it offer to the disillusioned German people?

Hitler miming gestures to a record of his speeches; one of an extraordinary series of photographs he commissioned in 1925 to aid self-analysis and improve his hold over an audience.

Hitler's contribution to the history of the twentieth century has been one of destruction. The war he started in 1939, argues Jeremy Noakes, was to recast the pattern of our world irreparably.