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Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland, by Anthony Van Dyck, 1641. Collection of the Duke of Devonshire, Chatsworth House, Derbyshire/Bridgeman Images

In an age of political and religious division that ended in Civil War, Lucius Cary and his circle at Great Tew offered a space for debate and compromise.

David dances on the moonlit heath, William Powell Frith, late 19th century.

Along with Robin Hood, the romantic highwayman is one of the great myths of English outlawry. But the model for this most gallant of rogues was a Frenchman name Claude Duval, who carried out audacious robberies with a touch of Parisian flair.

Map showing the route from London to Dover, showing major towns and cities.

A look at John Ogilby's Britannia road atlas.

Call to liberty: The March of the Guards to Finchley.

The painter’s reaction to the Jacobite Rebellion is more than mere satire.

Alan Haynes describes the Flemish weavers imported to London in the reign of James I and how, throughout the seventeenth century, their work continued.

Bernard Pool introduces Secretary to James, Duke of York, 1660-7, and a Commissioner for the Navy.

In his career as rake and satirist, writes John Redwood, Rochester illustrated both the vices and virtues of the Restoration court.

James I was a firm believer in Christian unity; Dorothy Boyd Rush describes his distrust of extremists, Catholic or Protestant.

William Seymour describes how a large area of Dorset and Wiltshire, abounding in deer, was hunted by King John and granted to Robert Cecil by James I.

C. Northcote Parkinson describes the life and times of Jeffery Hudson of Oakham, Rutlandshire, a remarkable member of Charles I's court who nonetheless measured under three feet tall.