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China

Chinese medical staff prepare facilities during an outbreak of pneumonic plague, Shenyang, 1910 © Corbis/Getty Images.

The Chinese government’s reaction to the Covid-19 pandemic reveals much about its memory of the humiliations of the 19th century.

Zhou at Huairou Reservoir, Beijing, 1960 © Bridgeman Images.

How important was China’s senior diplomat to his nation’s rise to global power, or is it too early to say?

A mass rally in Tiananmen Square of Beijing in 1965 against U.S. intervention in Congo-Léopoldville. Wiki Commons.

An outsider’s observations from the moments before China’s Cultural Revolution.

Ben Jones.

The repression in China’s Xinjiang region has deep historical roots.

Japanese travel poster for the Great Wall of China,1937 © Bridgeman Images.

The story of China and Japan, and the periodic efforts to find a modus vivendi.

Mao Zedong (second from left) meeting farm workers to congratulate them on their yield, 9 February 1958 © Hulton Getty Images.

How China’s landscape prevented even greater losses in the Great Famine.

He Xian Gu on a celestial crane, from the album of 18 Taoist paintings by Zhang Lu (1464-1538), displayed in the Shanghai Museum.

The Taoist Immortal.

Empire 1.0: Florence Preston drives in the last peg of the Uganda Railway.

Though much of the West has withdrawn from empire, one of the world’s rising powers offers the latest twist on imperialism.  

The 19th and 20th centuries saw a revolution in Chinese forensic science, when traditional techniques were replaced by new methods from the West. Today, the world confronts another moment of transformation in forensic science.

Reparations paid by the Chinese to the US following the Boxer Rebellion were used to open Tsinghua University in Beijing on 11 April, 1911.