Britain

As the UK prepares to vote, the Conservatives are attempting to delegitimise a Labour-SNP coalition.

Virginia Nicholson acknowledges the debt she owes as a popular historian to academics such as Roland Quinault, whose 2001 essay on Britain in the 1950s remains a rich source of information.

The people of Brighton offered a warm welcome to the Indian soldiers sent to convalesce at the Sussex resort in the First World War. But the military authorities found much to be nervous about.

Can the UK’s politicians offer lasting, inclusive solutions to the constitutional fall-out from last year’s referendum on Scottish independence? The historical precedents are not encouraging, warns Naomi Lloyd-Jones.

Mail reform came to Britain on January 10th, 1840.

Cyril Hamshere describes how the British community in Argentina came to be, at one point, the largest outside the Empire.

Among Victorian writers King George IV acquired an unenviable reputation; John Raymond re-interprets his personality.

Among Victorian writers King George IV acquired an unenviable reputation; John Raymond re-interprets his personality.

Henry I. Kurtz describes how many of the outstanding problems between Britain and the United States were settled by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842.

E.E.Y. Hales outlines the theories of and challenges to the British socialist historian and philosopher.

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