Volume 52 Issue 2 February 2002

The author of Les Misérables was born on February 26th, 1802.

Richard Cavendish describes the King's funeral on February 15th, 1952.

The American aviator was born on February 4th, 1902.

On Feb 4, 2002, the Women's Library opens in an extraordinary new building in Aldgate East in London. The new library is a place for people to debate and explore what the future holds for women.

Michael Vickers considers the original value of Greek ceramics, and why it has become inflated in recent centuries.

On the 60th anniversary of the fall of Singapore, arguably the nadir of Anglo-Australian relations, Richard Wilkinson explores the strange relationship between the two countries in the last century.

Graham Norton introduces the complex colonial history of the Caribbean island.

Larry Gragg recounts the reasons for the visit of the Quaker George Fox to Barbados in 1671, and the significance of his presence there.

Christopher Duggan recalls the contribution of a forgotten Italian statesman - Francesco Crispi.

J.W. Bartlett on the response of the British public to government campaigns to finance ship-building during the Second World War.

David Cannadine recalls the career and personality of an inspirational historian.

David Cesarani reflects on the past, present and future of education about genocide and bigotry.

Jacqui Goddard on the latest findings at the important Roman site on the Danube.

Charles Lysaght strips away some of the many mysteries surrounding Brendan Bracken, Churchill’s staunch but enigmatic supporter, and the founder of this magazine.