Elizabeth I

Portrait of Lettice Knollys c.1541-1634) by Sarah Essex, c.1825. Over Christmas 1569, one of the keepers at Bolton Castle – recently abandoned by a...
There is a lot to like about this book. John Guy’s thesis is that Elizabeth’s biographers have tended to concentrate on her life up to the age of 50...

In 1562 the young monarch was cured of a dangerous attack of smallpox.

Anna Whitelock ’s lively and engaging history begins when Elizabeth is a 13-year-old princess and ends with a brief survey of films and books that...
Another year, another biography of Elizabeth I. Even the most ardent admirer of Gloriana might be forgiven for thinking that just a little breathing...
Elizabeth I embraced an important truth that had evaded her father and her siblings: no ruler can dictate his/her subject’s beliefs. What she could,...

Historians have often depicted the final years of Elizabeth I’s reign as a period of decline or crisis. Yet her government operated more successfully than is usually thought.

The failure of the Plot, writes Cyril Hamshere, forms a complex story of espionage and counter-espionage; its events caused Elizabeth I to give up all ideas of restoring Mary Queen of Scots to the Scottish throne.

Alan Haynes describes how, in 1567, permission for the holding of ‘a very rich Lottery General’ was granted by English government.

At the end of the sixteenth century, writes David N. Durant, an ostentatious but simple-minded German Duke began pestering Queen Elizabeth to grant him the noblest of all English Orders.