Volume 68 Issue 3 March 2018

The historian on her love for Mary Wollstonecraft, Locke’s manuscripts and why you should wash your hands.

The French emperor was a hero to the composer, inspiring a revolutionary symphony. But disillusionment was soon to follow.

Henri Pirenne transformed the way historians think about the end of the Classical world and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

During the Second World War, Britain, the US and the Soviet Union worked together in oil-rich Iran. But cooperation was to degenerate into suspicion and hostility.

In the fashionable female circles of 18th-century Paris, a physician who recommended fresh air, exercise and looser corsets became a celebrated figure.

The man who conspired to kill Julius Caesar was not quite the friend to Romans and countrymen that his legendary status suggests. 

The myths that surround the ultimately tragic rule of Charles I mask the realities of a courageous and uxorious king who fell foul of a bitter struggle between two sides of English Protestantism.

Behind the dominating presence of Frankenstein, the richness of Mary Shelley’s life is in danger of being lost.