Volume 66 Issue 9 September 2016

The rebuilding of London required an image of what had been lost. Kate Wiles shares one such survey from 1669.

The Booker Prize-winning writer eschewed autobiographical novels for historical fiction in a bid to resolve the porous distinction between objective and subjective history, writes Alexander Lee.

South-East Asia’s ‘Golden Triangle’ dominated the world’s opium production during the 1980s. David Hutt reveals how a young soldier from north Burma took on the United States government to become the region’s most notorious drug lord.

The ‘middle Medici’ – two popes, two dukes, two bastards and a future queen of France – are too often left out of the dynasty’s history. Catherine Fletcher addresses that gap.

Mao Zedong’s brutal campaign to purify Communist China, which began in the early 1960s, resulted in a decade of chaos that has left an indelible stain on the nation’s politics.

The epic German offensive to take the strategically crucial fortress in north-east France reached its bloody end 100 years ago this month. Robert Foley looks at how and why Erich von Falkenhayn, the Chief of the German General Staff, sought to break the deadlock on the Western Front.

As the holders of both our cultural and personal memories, books seem sacred and their destruction, no matter the cause, is always shocking, writes Kenneth Baker.

This month marks half a century of an independent Botswana. The intervening years have not been without turmoil, but the country has emerged, writes Stephen Chan, as a model African state.

The photographer, designer and aesthete Cecil Beaton brought a distinctly historical awareness to the realm of fashion, as Benjamin Wild explains.

Born of civil war in 1971, the former East Pakistan has wrangled with issues of religion, secularism and democracy ever since.

As the search for lost medieval kings continues, interest in them seems stronger than ever. But a warning from the past speaks of their – and our – ruin.

Did the idea of nuclear war make Britain’s wartime leader more God-fearing?

Western Australia’s desire to secede as ‘Westralia’ in 1933 was undermined by a change in Britain’s attitude towards its Empire.

Winston Churchill had a long association with Ireland, from his infancy in Dublin in the 1870s to his second premiership in the 1950s. During his...

The Mediterranean world loomed large in English culture in the 16th century. What is made strikingly clear in Jerry Brotton’s new book, This...

Legal history can be the dullest of subjects. Stories of the development of court rules and practices necessarily involve explanations of complex...

In 1988, Oxford University Press published Margaret Aston’s England’s Iconoclasts. Vol.1: Laws Against Images, a book which...

The Vietnam War has long been represented through the ‘authenticity’ of the GI experience. Those who ‘were there’ and related their experiences of...

I have written self-indulgently, as I myself like to read about the past. I do not like the proper names of nonentities, numbered dates of...