Volume 67 Issue 4 April 2017

A 19th-century folly inspired by Stonehenge.

Reparations paid by the Chinese to the US following the Boxer Rebellion were used to open Tsinghua University in Beijing on 11 April, 1911.

The Reinheitsgebot was adopted on 23 April 1516.

Another history of the Raj invites comparison with its two most distinguished predecessors, Penderel Moon’s The British Conquest & Dominion...
In 1700, India, then ruled by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, an autocratic religious zealot, boasted 24.4 per cent of global GDP: a share almost equal...
Buffy Sainte-Marie performing in the Netherlands, 1968. I admire the chutzpah of this book. At a time when discussion of Native American history is...

The maxim ‘show don’t tell’ is often forgotten when film-makers confront historical horrors, argues Suzannah Lipscomb, as two recent cinema releases demonstrate.

Kate Wiles on Auldjo’s artistic map of Vesuvius across 200 year of major eruptions.

Perhaps the greatest disaster to ever befall humanity, the pandemic of 1918 is strangely overlooked.

In the first official games, which began on April 6th, 1896, 241 athletes from 14 countries competed in 43 events.

What is the soul, where does it come from and where does it go when we die? Such questions have continued to fascinate since the early modern period, and have resulted in surprisingly creative answers. 

Angered by his native country’s rush towards western-style modernisation, the acclaimed Japanese author committed a shocking act of protest.

As Britain got hooked on tobacco, smoking paraphernalia became ubiquitous. Items such as tobacco boxes provide an insight into the anxieties and aspirations of the early modern psyche.

Despite its popularity in France, the political memoir took a while to get going in Britain. It was Lord Clarendon’s epic attempt to make sense of the turbulent 17th century that slowly set the ball rolling.

In the absence of a European democratic model, the Founding Fathers turned to the apparently perfect state of the Iroquois Five Nations as a template for a federal United States, combining the best of both worlds.

Viking sagas tell of conflict and heroic voyages but are prone to fantasy and exaggeration. How accurate are their scant accounts of the treatment of those injured in battle? Brian Burfield examines the elusive practice of Viking medicine.

Few episodes in the history of the British Labour movement have been as mythologised as that in which six Dorset farm labourers were shipped to Australia for their trade union activities.

Iran, despite its conquest by the armies of Islam, retained its own Persian language and much of its culture. Khodadad Rezakhani examines the process by which a Zoroastrian empire became part of the Islamic world.  

The Hydra, a magazine produced by shell shock patients, was pioneering as a mental health care treatment.

Seeking a new life when poverty forced them from their homes, Victorian emigrants were at the mercy of others.

The ideas set out by Martin Luther sparked a reformation in the idea of authority itself.