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Volume 66 Issue 6 June 2016

The royal flight to Varennes took place on June 20th, 1791.

A Japanese map produced during the Second World War encouraged children to follow the Empire's military effort, explains Kate Wiles.

Aristotle is so synonymous with learning that he has been known simply as ‘the Mind’, ‘the Reader’ and ‘the Philosopher’. Admired by both Darwin and Marx, Edith Hall explores his life and legacy.

The songwriter was born on June 9th, 1891.

Henry VIII's coronation was greeted with a sense of hysterical optimism. As Lauren Johnson shows, it would not last.

We might applaud the tall, blond and ruggedly handsome Vikings of pop culture as being historically accurate, but authentic engagement with the past requires more than just convincing hair and make-up.

Although best known as Elizabeth I’s court magician, John Dee was also one of England’s most learned men. Katie Birkwood explores his books and the wealth of information they can provide on his early life. 

Through the myth of the executioner’s mask, Alison Kinney explores our tortured relationship with life, death, mortality and museums.

For the tsarist regime, Siberia was a ‘vast prison without a roof’, where thousands of revolutionaries and political opponents were exiled. It became, as Daniel Beer explains, a laboratory of the Russian Revolution.

Two historians take opposing sides as Britain’s referendum on EU membership approaches.