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Volume 65 Issue 11 November 2015

Roger Hudson describes advances in British military aviation technology in the years before the Second World War.

The Byzantine emperor died in Constantinople on 14 November 565.

Chaplin's celebrated film first appeared on 15 October 1940. 

The legend of La Llorona has supposedly haunted Mexico since before the Conquest. Her story is one of violence, much like the country whose suffering she is often taken to represent. Beware the woman in white ...

The popularity of Goethe’s novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther, was blamed for a spate of suicides. It set a trend for manufactured outrage that is with us still.

The first effective miners' safety lamp was unveiled on November 9th 1815.

Jerome de Groot muses on how authors of historical fiction try to flesh out the bare bones of history, drawing on old and new works.

The reforming Tsar sought to westernise his empire, yet in 1723 he published an uncompromising reassertion of his absolutist doctrine, which has traditionally marked Russia’s national consciousness.

Britain’s Industrial Revolution is most closely associated with the Midlands and the North. But the capital was also a centre of innovation and enterprise, as David Waller explains.

As calls for women’s suffrage gained momentum following the American Civil War, an uncomfortable racial fault-line began to emerge within the movement, argues Jad Adams.

Three very different writers reported on the exotic and despotic court of the Emperor Haile Selassie. Jeffrey Meyers compares and contrasts. 

In 1615 Katharina, mother of the great scientist Johannes Kepler, was accused of witchcraft. Ulinka Rublack asks what her landmark trial tells us about early-modern attitudes towards science, nature and the family.

The reputation of Britons as a people who tightly control their emotions in the face of adversity is not necessarily a deserved one, argues Thomas Dixon.

Inspirational schoolmaster who became a leading scholar of 18th-century Europe.

The British government should be more open in its dealings with researchers.

The current conflict in southern Arabia is threatening one of the most remarkable sites of the region’s pre-Islamic civilisations.