Volume 65 Issue 10 October 2015

Prisoners of war are driven to their execution in a harrowing image from 1950.

The explorer died on October 20th 1890.

Poor and small, Portugal was at the edge of late medieval Europe. But its seafarers created the age of ‘globalisation’, which continues to this day.

The English noble and a major figure during the reign of Henry IV died on October 13th 1415.

Peter Schröder highlights key publications on Germany’s contribution to the history of ideas from the Enlightenment to the present day.

On the 500th anniversary of Henry V’s victory, British troops were once more struggling against overwhelming odds in northern France. Stephen Cooper looks at how Britons of the Great War found inspiration in the events of St Crispin’s Day, 1415.

Throughout the 20th century responses by Britons to the sexual abuse of children have been hindered by the desire to avoid scandal and blame the victim, argue Adrian Bingham, Lucy Delap, Louise Jackson and Louise Settle. 

Too many historians and commentators view history from a western perspective. In doing so, they turn their back on the roots of our global system, argues Peter Frankopan.

The Battle of Agincourt is among the most celebrated of all English victories. Yet, argues Gwilym Dodd, Henry V’s triumph against overwhelming odds sowed the seeds for England’s ultimate defeat in the Hundred Years War. 

Emperor Franz Joseph officially opened the Ringstrasse on May 1st, 1865. Adrian Mourby looks at its 150 years as a Viennese landmark.

In drawing parallels with international events of the 1980s and 1990s, Michael Antonucci’s article from 1993 neglected the ideology that underpinned Byzantine diplomacy.

Following Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo, France’s Bourbon monarchy was restored. It was the first, fragile step in a diminished state’s return to the family of European nations.

The ancient rune-like writing system is carved into stones across Ireland.

New discoveries about Winchester Cathedral provide insights into the relationships between a prominent churchman and his Tudor kings.

Mihir Bose challenges the perception of Winston Churchill as a demi-god who was essential to Britain's war effort.