This Month's Magazine

Cover of the August issue
Cover of the August issue

In our August issue:

  • Rising son: the story of Manjirō, a Japanese teenager shipwrecked on a Pacific atoll helped transform relations between Japan and the United States
  • The enigma of Emily Brontë
  • Female spies in the Irish War of Independence
  • Helmut Schmidt, Germany’s Anglophile Chancellor
  • Italy’s fascist past
  • Britain’s role in Iran

You can buy this issue from our website or at newsagents across the United Kingdom (find your nearest stockist) from 19 July. You can also subscribe or read it as a digital edition via the History Today App.

There's also a Spotify playlist to accompany the issue, featuring songs inspired by the magazine's contents:

 

 

Selected articles from this issue

Don Cossacks in army uniform wait in line for borscht, 2006.

A staple of Russia and the Slavic world, borscht has inspired films and novels – and has even reached outer space.

Seated Bodhisattva, Avalokiteśvara, or Guanyin, China, 11th century.

The compassionate Buddhist deity who walks among us.

'The Polling' (detail), the third in William Hogarth’s four-part series, An Election, 1754.

What electoral rights did Britons have in the century before 1918?

The Brontë sisters portrayed by Patrick Branwell Brontë, c. 1834.

Since the moment Emily Brontë died we have tried – and failed – to understand who she was. 

Schmidt, the new Chancellor of West Germany, 1974.

The West German chancellor Helmut Schmidt was an admirer of Britain from an early age. But his vision of European integration was not that of his British counterparts. 

Manjirō Nakahama, late 19th century.

A teenager shipwrecked on a Pacific atoll helped transform relations between Japan and the United States.

Republican women recite the Rosary outside Dublin’s Mountjoy Prison following the execution of IRA member Thomaas Traynor during the Anglo-Irish War.

Women played a minor role in the Easter Rising of 1916. But they became crucial intelligene agents in the Anglo-Irish War.

Monument commemorating the Battle of Naseby.

The dramatic events that shook Britain in the 17th century resonate more strongly than ever, despite attempts to marginalise them.

Fill-in-the-blank postcard, c.1940.

From the taming of the ‘Wild West’ to the lucrative wages of sin.

Bad wine: bottles of Lunardelli wine, Bibione near Venice, September 2003.

Never fully exorcised, the memory of Italy’s fascist past is fading.

Ellan Vannin: postcard, late 19th/early 20th century.

From monks to Vikings to tourists, Manx has (almost) survived against the odds.

Given the boot: monarchists and the Iranian army celebrate in Tehran, 27 August 1953.

Why the British government can’t reveal more about an ‘open secret’. 

‘Illiterate men can contemplate in the lines of a picture’:  Gregory the Great, attributed to Carlo Saraceni, c.1610.

The concerns of a Sardinian abbess, as seen through the letters of Gregory the Great.

General de Gaulle on 18 June 1940 in the recording studio of the BBC at Broadcasting House, London.

From de Gaulle’s call to arms against Vichy France to Liberation four years later.

Kore 674, Archaic period marble statue from the Acropolis, Athens.

A reconsideration of our complicated relationship with ancient Greece, questioning how we view it through the lens of the 18th century.

Bhor Ghat Railway at Maharashtra, on the crest of the Western Ghats, India, 1883.

The creation of India’s fantastic rail network was the work of the British Raj, but it came at a high price for Indians themselves.