Nigel Saul

Henry III with representations of Westminster Abbey and  two church bells, from the ‘Chronicle of England’, by Peter de Langtoft, c.1307-27 © British Library Board/Bridgeman Images.

The complex reign of Henry III, the fourth longest in English history.

Louis IX passes judgement in favour of Henry III at Amiens, January 1265, an idealised representation by Georges Rouget, 1920.

Just half a century on from Magna Carta, a radical noble, part idealist, part megalomaniac, came into conflict with King John’s son, Henry III. The result, argues Nigel Saul, was a form of assembly which shapes English political life to this day.

Portrait of King John by an unknown artist. c.1620.

Nigel Saul marks the 800th anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta with a comprehensive overview of the landmark books that dominate the field.

Gerald Harriss

A masterly medievalist, he trained a generation of leading historians.

Nigel Saul remembers a historian who was one of the most distinguished medievalists of his generation.

Medieval knights were the sporting superstars and military heroes of their day, who performed before an adoring public in the tournament. Nigel Saul explains their appeal.

Nigel Saul salutes his colleague’s achievement of 100 authored books on a wide range of historical subject matter.

The design and building of Salisbury Cathedral, the Gothic masterpiece and pinnacle of English architecture, built in double-quick time.

Philippe and Richard II

Nigel Saul discusses attempts to revive the crusading zeal in late medieval Europe and explains why they failed to rekindle the fervour of the earlier movement.