L.W. Cowie

The Houses of Parliament before the 1834 Fire, by J. Shury & Son, c.1834 - See more at: http://www.historytoday.com/rebekah-moore/palace-westminster-repairs-renovations-and-moving-out#sthash.ZjILcb0t.dpuf

The remains of the Palace were almost completely destroyed by the fire of 1834 and, writes L.W. Cowie, the Houses of Parliament were rebuilt by Sir Charles Barry.

Briefly a royal palace, writes L.W. Cowie, Bridewell became a hospital, an apprentices’ school and a reformatory for vagrants and prostitutes.

L.W. Cowie takes the reader on a visit to a city monastery, for three hundred years associated with the Dominicans and, after the Reformation, with the theatre.

First the mansion of the House of Lancaster, writes L.W. Cowie, then a hospital of the Tudors, the Savoy was once said to be the finest residence in England.

A 1916 engraving of Old St Paul's as it appeared before the fire of 1561.

Until the mid seventeenth century, writes L.W. Cowie, the nave of old St Paul’s Cathedral was an active centre of commerce.

L.W. Cowie describes how, early in 1805, a series of strong points were built along the British coast-line, to defend against Napoleon’s army, then arrayed across the Channel.

L.W. Cowie describe show the Franciscans came to London in the thirteenth century and founded a highly patronised friary.

The Friars Hermits of St Augustine founded their London house in 1253. L.W. Cowie describes how, after the Reformation, it became the Dutch Protestant Church.

A classic example of the pre-Reform Act ‘pocket borough’, L.W. Cowie describes how the uninhabited Salisbury town of Old Sarum did not lose its Parliamentary privileges until 1832.

Thomas More and his family moved into his ‘Great House’ in Chelsea in 1518. L.W. Cowie describes their life there, until More's arrest in 1534.