Joanna Richardson

Joanna Richardson describes how Queen Victoria’s eldest daughter, Vicky, married an amiable future German Emperor.

Queen Victoria’s uncle and immediate predecessor was a good-humoured, simple-minded sovereign, whose bustling amiability much endeared him to his subjects, writes Joanna Richardson.

The whole of Stendhal’s youth was spent under the aegis of Napoleon, and Napoleonic legend played an increasing part in his later writings.

After a happy marriage, writes Joanna Richardson, the Heiress Apparent died, three years before her father became King George IV.

Poet Laureate from 1850, writes Joanna Richardson, Tennyson became an acknowledged interpreter of Victorian morals and politics.

In British theatrical history, writes Joanna Richardson, the famous Kemble line has an almost unequalled record of achievement.

Joanna Richardson describes how, in 1865, Miss Buss told a School Enquiry Commission: 'I am sure that the girls can learn anything they are taught in an interesting manner.’

Joanna Richardson describes how the diarists of the early nineteenth century wrote some highly distinctive memoirs of politics and Court life.

Joanna Richardson describes some French visitors to England, from Louis XVIII and Madame de Stael to Verlaine and Mallarme.

Poet, novelist, journalist and international commentator; Joanna Richardson portrays Théophile Gautier, a man who typifies the restless energy of the social period in which he lived.