National Army Museum

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The changing shape of the slave trade in the medieval Mediterranean.

 

As Britain got hooked on tobacco, smoking paraphernalia became ubiquitous. Items such as tobacco boxes provide an insight into the anxieties and aspirations of the early modern psyche, says Angela McShane.

Perhaps the greatest disaster to ever befall humanity, the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 is strangely overlooked. Laura Spinney examines our shared memory of that and earlier tragedies.  

Few episodes in the history of the British Labour movement have been as mythologised as that in which six Dorset farm labourers were shipped to Australia for their trade union activities. But, as Roland Quinault shows, their story is more complex and revealing than the myths allow.

Laughing at experts is nothing new. Kate Davison explores our long history of puncturing the powerful with satire and humour – to keep them in line and just for the fun of it.  

Volunteer rationing in the First World War depended on patriotism, but that could only go so far.

How Thomas Browne did battle with fake news in the 17th century.

The world does not influence Britain’s native culture, the world is its culture, as anyone with a grasp of the country’s history will understand, argues Suzannah Lipscomb.

James Christie first held his eponymous auction on December 5th, 1766.

Jan Plamper opens The History of Emotions with a visit to an anatomy room. His research on the history of fear among soldiers had led him...