Science & Technology

Makeshift: the Sea Gem in position in the North Sea

Klaus Dodds looks back 50 years to a crucial – and ultimately tragic – moment in the UK’s exploitation of its oil and gas resources. 

Gathering bulbs: garlic harvested in a Latin version of an Arabic book on health, late 14th century.

The Scientific Revolution put an end to beliefs that were once considered rational but now seem bizarre. If we want to understand why, we need to look at the increasing importance of the ‘fact’, says David Wootton.

The mathematician and pioneering computer programmer was born on 10 December 1815.

The Thames Tunnel, designed by the Brunels, under construction, illustration, 1828.

Britain’s Industrial Revolution is most closely associated with the Midlands and the North. But the capital was also a centre of innovation and enterprise, as David Waller explains.

E.R. Truitt revisits John Cohen’s 1963 article on the history of automata and the quest to recreate humanity.

Publishing pioneer: Henry Oldenburg by Jan van Cleve, 1668.

A German scholar living in 17th-century London revolutionised the way scientists shared news of their latest advances.

The discoverer of oxygen - a man of ‘singular energy and varied abilities’ - was, writes A.D. Orange, also a bold progressive thinker.

Darwin’s cousin in the nineteenth century, writes C.H. Corning, was a daring explorer of the world and a pioneer in the scientific study of racial qualities.

‘A sort of giant’, with immensely long arms and legs and a mop of bristling red hair, Felix Nadar employed his creative gifts in several different arts and sciences.

Joanna Richardson describes the life and work of the French father of science fiction.