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Political

Disturbances  at Manchester!, illustration by Atkins, 1819 © Mary Evans Picture Library

Commemoration of Peterloo remembers the dead, but also promotes future democratic change.

‘March of the Women on Versailles, Paris, 5 October 1789’, 18th-century engraving © Bridgeman Images

Liberalism became the dominant ideology of the West when it was adopted by Britain and the United States. But its roots lie elsewhere.

Obverse side of a medal commemorating the Peterloo Massacre, 19th century © Timothy Millett Collection/Bridgeman Images

It is the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre. How have the events of that day been remembered?

Margaret Thatcher and Conservative  Party Chairman Cecil Parkinson, celebrating the Conservative election victory, 9 June 1983 © Getty Images

Assessing Margaret Thatcher’s premiership: a radical decade and a divisive legacy. 

‘Hitler wants Hogg’: children with placards supporting A.D. Lindsay, Oxford, 27 October 1938.

The by-elections of 1938 are part of the long history of Independent Progressives in British politics.

Illustration by Ben Jones.

The Labour Party’s recent entanglement with antisemitism came as a shock to many. At its root is the issue of nationalism. 

Mosaic from Hagia Sofia depicting Constantine I with a representation of the city of Constantinople

Though the beginnings of the Byzantine Empire are unclear, its demise is not. The history of the Eastern Roman Empire, from its foundation in 324 to its conquest in 1453, is one of war, plague, architectural triumphs and fear of God's wrath.

The ‘C Room’ in the Members’ Library.

For 200 years, the House of Commons Library has guided politicians and policy.

Robert  Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1820.

The prime minister at the time of Napoleon’s defeat was a keen observer of European politics. His government sought a balance of power on the Continent, but with minimal British engagement.

'The Polling' (detail), the third in William Hogarth’s four-part series, An Election, 1754.

What electoral rights did Britons have in the century before 1918?