Film & TV

Hollywood offers a new version of the Exodus story, the West’s most enduring political narrative.

The much-loved film first appeared in theatres on December 15th, 1939.

Alarm about moral degeneracy and ‘family values’ provoked Hollywood to instigate its own self-censorship codes in the 1920s. But much more than prudery underpinned their lasting impact, says Tim Stanley.

Taylor Downing looks at the making of the pioneering television series that launched BBC2 and marked the 50th anniversary of the First World War.

The strangeness of the past can be evoked more effectively in pick and mix fantasies than in those novels, films and TV dramas that aspire to realism, argues Suzannah Lipscomb.

It must have seemed a somewhat quixotic enterprise to produce in 1981 a major feature film about an athletic rivalry in a long forgotten Olympic...

London 2012 will be the biggest television spectacle ever. Taylor Downing reflects on the extraordinary links between the Olympics and the moving picture throughout their histories.

Kathryn Hadley reports on the recent discovery of two 3-D Nazi propaganda films. Released in 1936, they were decades ahead of the boom in 3-D films in the American film industry.

As Coronation Street celebrates half a century in the nation’s living rooms, Andrew Roberts looks at why an intensely parochial television series that has wilfully refused to acknowledge change is still going strong.

From A.J.P. Taylor’s mesmerising lectures in front of a black backdrop to technicolour Civilisation and the ground-breaking World At War, Taylor Downing looks at the early days of history on television.