Cultural

Confronting the brutal facts of history can be difficult. But how far should we protect ourselves from them before it becomes censorship? 

An exhibition at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.

James G. Clark investigates the destruction of western Europe's medieval heritage during the First World War, as churches and cathedrals became targets, and how it made people think anew about their nations's pasts.

Michael Greenhalgh describes how Roman architecture and Graeco-Roman statues made a profound impression upon the great Renaissance artists.

Though he exercised little political influence, Victor Hugo’s genius and his ardent championship of liberty had made him a legendary figure long before his death.

The visit of the Baroque master in 1665, writes Michael Greenhalgh, coincided with a rejection of Italian influence by French taste.

In 1773, writes A. Lentin, the radical philosophe paid a difficult visit to his patroness in St Petersburg.

Revisiting one of the first historical studies in the developing ‘science’ of well-being. By Sandie McHugh and Jerome Carson.

Queen Victoria’s Consort was a man of exceptional intelligence; among his many interests, writes Winslow Ames, was the collection of early German and Italian paintings and the encouragement of contemporary artists.

J.T. Ward describes how romantic views of the Middle Ages and a dislike for the horrors of industrialism inspired an able group of young Conservatives in the House of Commons during the 1840s.

X

Subscribe

August issue of History Today

In Print

Online

The App