Art

Arrival of Napoleon in Venice, by Giuseppe Borsato, 19th century.

The arrival of Napoleon’s troops in Venice in 1797 instigated one of the biggest plunders in the history of art. 

Portrait of Marie Antoinette with her Children, by Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1787. (Château de Versailles, France / Bridgeman Images)

There were many obstacles preventing women from becoming artists in the 18th century, but those who overcame them created some of the most influential art of their time. 

Courtesy the artist, Hollybush Gardens and National Museums, Liverpool/International Slavery Museum. Installation view at Spike Island, Bristol. Photography Stuart Whipps

Turner Prize winner Lubaina Himid’s artworks fill in the gaps that history leaves behind.

The Desert, or A Fallen Monarch,  by Edwin Landseer, 1849.

The arrival of big cats to 19th-century London forced a change in the image left by mythology and the Old Masters. 

The second painting in Augustus Leopold Egg’s Past and Present trilogy.

Attitudes to female sexuality in the 19th century were rigid and unflinching and those who failed to conform were ostracised and persecuted. Victoria Leslie compares how fallen women were portrayed in the arts with the real stories of those who ‘fell’. 

An engrossing exhibition on the origins and development of drawing from ancient sculptures. 

Charles Sims R.A. (1873-1928)

The life of the artist Charles Sims and his controversial, little-known mural in St Stephen’s Hall, Westminster depicting King John at Runnymede. 

Self portrait by James Gillray

The artist died on June 1st, 1815.

The painter Claude Monet spent his early twenties as a soldier in French North Africa, yet none of his works or writings from this period survive.

Goya lived from 1746 to 1828; Douglas Hilt describes how the artist's vigorous work ranges in subject from Court-paintings to the misfortunes of Unreason and War.