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Archaeology

The Temple of Bel, 2001

The destruction of Palmyra robbed us of one of antiquity’s great trading cities.

Examination of a Mummy - a Priestess of Amun, by Paul Dominique Philippoteaux, French, c.1891. © akg-images/Erich Lessing.

Despite a total lack of evidence, the belief that grains of wheat found in Ancient Egyptian tombs could produce bountiful crops was surprisingly hardy. 

Image of Jane Dieulafoy. Copyright Bridgeman Images

Behind the traditional story of archaeology, with its pith-helmeted Victorian gentlemen, are the equally important yet neglected stories of its female pioneers.

The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina

New publications and recent developments in the field.

Terracotta figure with a headdress of flowers, rings and a belt, c.3000 BC.

The civilisation that arose in the Indus valley around 5,000 years ago was only discovered in the early 20th century. Andrew Robinson looks at what we know about this extraordinary culture.

Detail from one of the paintings.

The Paleolithic illustrations were found on 12 September 1940.

The uppermost skeletons in the larger of the two mass graves, at the north-east side of the site. The person at the centre was laid on his right side on top of another individual. Credit Richard Annis/Durham University

Remains found at Durham University shed new light on Oliver Cromwell's victory at the Battle of Dunbar.

A skull at the Crossrail dig, London

As archaeologists at London's Crossrail site begin the colossal task of excavating 3,000 skeletons, we should pause to consider the hearts, minds and lives of the ‘normal’ people who once inhabited the bones. 

The North African country is considering how best to serve its rich heritage.

Besides administering the sub-continent, British public servants devoted endless time and energy to making a record of Indian archaeological remains. Mildred Archer describes the role of the East India Company from 1785-1858.