Spain

Interior of the Mezquita-Catedral de Córdoba, Spain.

A history of medieval Iberia that reaches beyond simply a tale of Convivencia and Reconquista.

Capital in the north portico to the Courtyard of the Myrtles in the Comares Palace of the Alhambra.

A comprehensive study of the Alhambra cuts through centuries of myth to give us a sense of the vibrant spectacle that greeted its original residents and diplomatic visitors.

The Expulsion of the Moors, Vicente Carducho, c.1627.

The mass expulsion of Spain’s Muslim population was a long and painful experience.

Detail of Djerba from Abraham Ortelius’ Map of the Mediterranean, 1570.

During a period of European peace, Spain sought to establish control of the Mediterranean. Yet a disastrous attempt to oust the Ottomans from North Africa threatened to accelerate the westward advance of Islam. 

Demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington, D.C., during the influenza pandemic of 1918

Perhaps the greatest disaster to ever befall humanity, the pandemic of 1918 is strangely overlooked.

© Roland and Sabrina Michaud/akg-images.

Kate Wiles highlights the Ottoman cartographer Piri Re'is and his charts, which blend navigation and art.

Eleventh-century Córdoba was at the heart of the rich culture of Muslim Andalusia. Among its greatest creative figures was Wallada, princess, patron and poet, and one of the most influential women writers in European history.

Jan Read describes how, between 1830 and 1840, two very different English travellers each produced a vivid account of Spanish scenes and personalities.

Goya lived from 1746 to 1828; Douglas Hilt describes how the artist's vigorous work ranges in subject from Court-paintings to the misfortunes of Unreason and War.

In his long series of novels, Galdos presents a vision of Spanish history from Napoleonic times until the 1880s. By Douglas Hilt.