Ireland

Anglo-Irish relations: Henry authorises Dermot to levy forces in 1170, from J.W.E. Doyle's A Chronicle of England, BC55 to AD 1485 (1863). (Bridgeman Images)

In the first of a new series, we ask historians one of the burning questions of the day. 

Antrim Coast, featuring the Giant’s Causeway, depicted in a poster for the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. Artwork by R.G. Praill, c.1924.

By escaping its neighbour’s orbit, the history of Ireland has moved out of its traditional comfort zones.

Republican women recite the Rosary outside Dublin’s Mountjoy Prison following the execution of IRA member Thomaas Traynor during the Anglo-Irish War.

Women played a minor role in the Easter Rising of 1916. But they became crucial intelligene agents in the Anglo-Irish War.

Anglo-Irish relations: Henry authorises Dermot to levy forces in 1170, from J.W.E. Doyle's A Chronicle of England, BC55 to AD 1485 (1863). (Bridgeman Images)

The Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in 1167 sowed the seeds for centuries of tension between England and the Irish.

United by conflict: members of the Irish Defence Force (left) and the British Army at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, July 2014

After the UK voted to leave Europe, Northern Ireland’s fragile relationship with both its past and its neighbour is once again to the fore.

The court buildings, Dublin. Hand-coloured engraving by James Malton, 1798.

Life for the poor in 18th- and 19th-century Ireland was hard and, for many women, prostitution was the only option. But the bawdy houses were rife with disease and police did little to protect women from violent customers.

Henry Street, Dublin

The attempt to overthrow British rule and found an Irish Republic began on 24 April 1916.

The trial for treason and execution of Roger Casement – humanitarian, homosexual and Irish Nationalist – which took place, in the wake of the Easter Rising of 1916, continues to resonate, as Andrew Lycett explains.

In memoriam: graves of soldiers from Irish units killed in the 1916 Easter Rising, Grangegorman Military Cemetery, Dublin, 2015.

The events that led to the creation of the Irish Free State and reshaped the United Kingdom were part of two inextricably linked histories.

By personality and perseverance over the past thirty-eight years, writes Edgar Holt, the rebel of 1923 has achieved most of his aims for Ireland, save unity.