The events that led to the creation of the Irish Free State and reshaped the United Kingdom were part of two inextricably linked histories.

Mo Moulton’s survey of the political and social aftermath of the Anglo-Irish War of 1919-21 asks challenging questions about how this conflict...

By personality and perseverance over the past thirty-eight years, writes Edgar Holt, the rebel of 1923 has achieved most of his aims for Ireland, save unity.

In certain parts of Spanish America today O’Higgins is a name still remembered and honoured to an extent that would surprise the great majority of Irishmen who have never heard of the once famous Viceroy of Peru or of his son, the founder of Chilean independence.

For more than a decade, writes Robert Rhodes James, until personal disaster overwhelmed him in 1890, Parnell and the Irish Nationalists held the balance in the House of Commons, and by a policy of considered obstruction swayed the course of British politics.

T.H. Corfe analyses a double assassination in Dublin that long left its scar on Anglo-Irish relations.

British historiography has been offered a once-in-a-generation opportunity to integrate Ireland’s contribution into analyses of the Great War, argues Catriona Pennell.

Boycotting, sanctioned by the fear of violence, was a dreadfully effective weapon; T.H. Corfe describes how its widespread use made Parnell the “Uncrowned King of Ireland.”

From 1848 until 1867, writes E.R.R. Green, the romantic nationalists of Ireland, with strong backing from the Irish-Americans, conspired in vain to make their country an “Independent Democratic Republic.”

Captain Boycott, whose name has added a word to the English language, was accepted as a symbol of the landlord class in troubled Ireland. By T.H. Corfe.



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