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India

Three Indian men on a verandah pulling punkha strings, c.1900 © Royal Society for Asian Affairs, London/Bridgeman Images

Sweltering British imperialists relied on an army of fan bearers, whose stories are as invisible as the air they circulated.

Hindus burn the bodies  of co-religionists who have died of starvation,  at Calcutta’s Myrone Memorial, 1943 © William Vandivert/LIFE/Getty Images

Starvation and disease killed millions in British India during the Second World War. Why?

A man being flogged in the wake of the Amritsar Massacre, 1919.

Was the massacre of April 1919 a symptom of British oppression, or an exceptional event?

The British Indian Army entering Baghdad in 1917.

India’s First World War experience as seen through personal archives.

Illustration by Ben Jones.

India’s decision to decriminalise homosexuality is presented as the country shaking off the last vestiges of colonialism. The reality is not so simple.

George V and Queen Mary watching the Delhi Durbar from the Red  Fort, accompanied by Indian princes acting as pages, 1911.

The voice of the British monarch carried considerable weight in imperial India. Its slow silencing mirrored the retreat of Britain from the subcontinent. 

Bhor Ghat Railway at Maharashtra, on the crest of the Western Ghats, India, 1883.

The creation of India’s fantastic rail network was the work of the British Raj, but it came at a high price for Indians themselves.

Thiruvalluvar statue at Kanya Kumari, Tamil Nadu, India.

An eclectic account of the complex history of south India, where centuries move back and forth.

‘Blowing mutinous Sepoys from the guns’, India, 1858.

The story of the skull of a victim of the Indian Uprising of 1857 raises profound questions about imperialism.  

Muslim refugees leaving Delhi for Pakistan, 26 September 1947

An analytical view of the traumatic Partition offers fresh perspectives on the devastating human cost.