East India Company

Volume 65 Issue 11 November 2015

The Byzantine emperor died on November 14th 565.

The first effective miners' safety lamp was unveiled on November 9th 1815.

Jerome de Groot muses on how authors of historical fiction try to flesh out the bare bones of history, drawing on old and new works.

Roger Hudson describes advances in British military aviation technology in the years before the Second World War.

Britain’s Industrial Revolution is most closely associated with the Midlands and the North. But the capital was also a centre of innovation and enterprise, as David Waller explains.

Chaplin's celebrated film first appeared on October 15th, 1940.

The popularity of Goethe’s novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther, was blamed for a spate of suicides. Frank Furedi argues that it set a trend for manufactured outrage that is with us still.

The reputation of Britons as a people who tightly control their emotions in the face of adversity is not necessarily a deserved one, argues Thomas Dixon.

Amy Fuller explores the complex origins of the Mexican legend of the wailing woman, now closely linked to the country’s celebrations of the Day of the Dead. 

Three very different writers reported on the exotic and despotic court of the Emperor Haile Selassie. Jeffrey Meyers compares and contrasts. 

In 1615 Katharina, mother of the great scientist Johannes Kepler, was accused of witchcraft. Ulinka Rublack asks what her landmark trial tells us about early-modern attitudes towards science, nature and the family.

Inspirational schoolmaster who became a leading scholar of 18th-century Europe.

The British government should be more open in its dealings with researchers.

The current conflict in southern Arabia is threatening one of the most remarkable sites of the region’s pre-Islamic civilisations.

The purpose of this book, whose articles are drawn (updated, though not always the ‘further reading’) from Blackwell’s five-volume ...

These essays by the pre-eminent interpreter of the American Revolution deal in equal measure with the impassioned perspectives that animate the...

A generation before Cortés landed on the coast of Mexico, the Portuguese had set out to find the sea route to India and establish control over the...

The Origin of Museums was wittily named after Charles Darwin’s ...

All too much of the recent literature on the background to the Great War has focused on the diplomacy and has seriously underplayed the roles of...

Janam Mukherjee has written an engrossing account of the most tragic event in the history of Bengal, the Great Famine of 1943, in which an...

Michael Jacobs is widely considered one of the most distinguished travel writers of his generation. In particular he wrote perceptively and...

‘Historians and readers’, says the French scholar Pierre Briant at the start of his book, ‘have always been fascinated by the history of great...

Churchill’s involvement with the British Empire has received much attention but his attitude to the Islamic world has been largely neglected. Yet...

Guy de la Bédoyère brings Roman Britain back to life through an engrossing study of those many individuals whose lives may escape the grand...