Volume 51 Issue 8 August 2001

Isaac Merritt Singer did not invent the sewing maching, but he patented the first practical and efficient one, on August 12th, 1851.

August 31st, 1751

The French mathematician was born on August 17th, 1601.

Isaac Merritt Singer did not invent the sewing maching, but he patented the first practical and efficient one, on August 12th, 1851.

William Rubinstein continues his survey of topics of enduring popular debate by examining the controversy surrounding the true identity of England's famous bard.

Stuart Hood recalls his involvement with the Italian partisans in 1943-44, and is surprised by the way events in which he participated are memorialised.

Margaret Mehl explains the surprising adoption of two Japanese scholars by their hometowns as major tourist attractions.

Philip Bagwell finds the origins of Britain's transport crisis in a long-standing debate over the role of the government.

Brian Harrison explains how a national institution is being updated.

The Science Museum in London last year opened its largest historical gallery. Timothy Boon, its Deputy Project Director, explains the roles of history within the display.

Robert Pearce reviews the responses to our annual survey of the world of undergraduate history in British universities.

Pamela Pilbeam looks at the appeal of utopian socialism in early 19th-century France.

John K. Walton looks at the Belgian seaside resort and the part British visitors played in its development.

Karen Thomas presents the struggles for Sahrawi identity, past and present, in North Africa.

Penelope Johnston explores a new museum of Canadian military history.

Keith Randell, founder of the inspiring textbook series Access to History, explains how he found his own way in.