New College of the Humanities

Volume 50 Issue 2 February 2000

The US Senator's anti-Communist 'Crusade' began on February 9th, 1950.

Charles II's mistress was born on February 2nd, 1650.

The US Senator's anti-Communist 'Crusade' began on February 9th, 1950.

The radical Italian thinker was burned at the stake on February 17th, 1600.

James Campbell peers into the murk of the ‘Dark Ages’ and sifts truth from fiction about our post-Roman history.

Phillip Hall analyses the finances of Britain’s monarchy, arguing that those who claim that the royals pay for themselves are misusing history.

Martin Evans contrasts the triumphalism of France’s 1931 Colonial Exhibition in Paris with the rotten reality of its ramshackle empire.

The city of Ghent in modern Belgium, birthplace of Charles V, is currently celebrating the 500th anniversary of his birth on February 24th, 1500.

Stephen Bourne tells how a Blitz adoption led to his passion for rediscovering Black history in Britain.

Penny Young looks at the ambititious plans to reconstruct the celebrated Ottoman bridge in Mostar, destroyed by fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovinia.

Timothy Benson analyses the evolution of the love-hate relationship between Britain's greatest cartoonist and the outstanding politician of the age.

Mike Greenwood on a new BBC initiative to help audiences take their interest in history further.

Peter Ling describes how the refusal of four black students to accept a lunch-counter colour bar led to the collapse of segregation in the American south.

Sean Lang describes the changes in college history since the sixties and deplores the trend towards Hitler-dominated history.

The last great medieval fortification in England, Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, has been preserved as a romantic ruin at a cost of £1 million by English Heritage. Jim Kelsey reports on this remarkable feat.

Debra Higgs Strickland examines the extraordinary demonology of medieval Christendom and the way it endowed strangers and enemies with monstrous qualities.

R.C. Macleod re-tells the story of the force that began by policing the Klondike and ended by spying on separatists and 'subversives'.