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Volume 48 Issue 11 November 1998

The Darien Colony was founded by Scottish emigrants on November 3rd, 1698. But it all went horribly wrong.

Seeing the potential of the new technology, William Henry Smith opened his first railway bookstall on November 1st, 1848.

Isaac Watts died on November 25th, 1748, aged 74, in Stoke Newington, Hackney.

The Darien Colony was founded by Scottish emigrants on November 3rd, 1698. But it all went horribly wrong.

Seeing the potential of the new technology, William Henry Smith opened his first railway bookstall on November 1st, 1848.

Isaac Watts died on November 25th, 1748, aged 74, in Stoke Newington, Hackney.

Richard Cavendish highlights a new exhibition at the Tate which celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Historic Houses Association.

Rebecca Daniels celebrates the fortieth anniversary of the Victorian Society, which set out in 1958 to save nineteenth-century architectural gems from destruction.

Ian Bremner reviews the Steven Spielberg film about D-Day and after

Jay Winter describes the mixed emotions of combatants and non-combatants at the moment the Great War ended.

Jane Ohlmeyer argues that the English Civil War was just one of an interlocking set of conflicts that encompassed the British Isles in the mid-seventeenth century

Marina Warner traces the origins of a lifetime’s curiosity in the power of stories.

Brian Catchpole remembers the sufferings and heroism of the Commonwealth Division in the first major conflict of the Cold War.

The latest multimedia innovations and their usefulness to historians.

John Adamson argues that the importance of the Celtic fringe in the events of the 1640s has been exaggerated.

Alex Werner previews a new exhibition on skeletons at the Museum of London.

The troubled history of the region, and the deep-rooted antagonisms between the different ethnic groups laying claim to it.

Stephen Williams and Gerard Friell analyse why Constantinople survived the barbarian onslaughts in the fifth century, whereas Rome fell.