Volume 37 Issue 7 July 1987

Frankish disunity and impetuosity produced a disaster that lost Christendom the holy city of Jerusalem.

Philip Collins argues that Dickens' writing reflects not only a marvellous rapport with a cross-section of Victorian society but an integration of populism with a concern for 'the raising up of those that are down.'

Dymphna Byrne explores two magnificent museums situated in Durham.

Philip Collins argues that Dickens' writing reflects not only a marvellous rapport with a cross-section of Victorian society but an integration of populism with a concern for 'the raising up of those that are down.'

One of history's little ironies - a period piece of First World War propaganda from a curious source which rebounded on its author.

The equation of sound money and balanced budgets with moral probity became difficult to maintain once the high point of 'laissez-faire' had been reached in Gladstone's mid-Victorian financial policies.

Simon Barclay accounts for the restoration of the Beverley gate in Hull

A historical pioneer of the 'longue durée' who found his own liberal vision of a European Russia clouded by the contradictions and pessimism of his own times.

Sarah Jane Evans examines the first of series of archaeological excavations on the Thames at Rotherhithe.

A look at the Georgian Group, who campaign for the protection of ancient buildings.

A tragi-comic sequence of mutiny and kidnap marked a crucial stage in the struggle of Nationalists and Communists for the hearts and minds of China.

Ronald Hutton takes a closer look at Charles II's Secret Treaty of Dover.