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Volume 23 Issue 8 August 1973

Goya lived from 1746 to 1828; Douglas Hilt describes how the artist's vigorous work ranges in subject from Court-paintings to the misfortunes of Unreason and War.

As forests and wild deer diminished in England, sportsmen took to the fox; Charles Chenevix Trench describes how hunting became the pastime of more varied social classes.

Teaching at Christ’s Hospital dates from 1552, writes N.M. Plumley, and its Royal Mathematical School from the reign of Charles II.

D.H. Burton writes that Roosevelt was one of the chief architects of an Anglo-American understanding that survived many diplomatic crises.

William Seymour describes how Robert Bruce defeated the army of Edward II in Stirlingshire and eventually secured recognition of Scottish independence.

J.A. Boyle describes how, in 1258, the Mongol Khans from Persia captured the Caliphate of Bagdad and international contacts followed with the European powers.