History Today

British systems of welfare and adult social care are not so different from aspects of the traditional Poor Laws.

Bedlam was a constant in art and literature throughout the 18th century. In it, madness was otherworldly, bestial, pitiable and female – a mirror for concerns about society. 

Looking beyond the usual rogues’ gallery of historical figures can help us to better understand the past.

In the third of our occasional series in which leading historians tell the story of major historical events with reference to the History Today archive, Bridget Heal offers an account of the man who split western Christendom for good.

If you believe the neologism 'post-truth' describes a new phenomenon, think again. Geoffrey Chaucer diagnosed the problem at the end of the 14th century, as Eleanor Parker points out.

Laughing at experts is nothing new. Kate Davison explores our long history of puncturing the powerful with satire and humour – to keep them in line and just for the fun of it.  

A meticulously researched oral history of migrant women workers in Britain over the last 70 years.

If you have recently eaten out,  gone to...

In his autobiography Interesting Times (2002) Hobsbawm wrote that, although he never tried to become or saw himself as a Latin...

Though written more for the academic than the lay reader, this ambitious series traces the lives and experiences of women through history. ...

This SLIM book is an extended assault on the often catastrophic consequences of collective memory. Against the current mantra that nations, like...