Issue 41 December 2001

Jez Ross takes issue with the traditional view that sees the early foreign policy of the second Tudor monarch as a costly failure.

Geoffrey Roberts explains the fateful sequence of events from the Nazi-Soviet Pact to Hitler's invasion of the USSR. 

Roger Spalding examines the continuing controversy that surrounds one of the key figures in the history of the Labour Party.

Nick Fellows provides a critique of a specimen answer in our latest Survival Skills feature.

F.G. Stapleton defends the record of Italian governments from 1861 to 1914.

Francis Murphy challenges the idea that science was religion’s foremost enemy, in this winning essay in the 2001 Julia Wood Award.

John Spiller shows that, in constitution-making in the USA (1787-89), France (1789-92) and Great Britain (1830-32), some men were considered more equal than others.

Russel Tarr asks key questions about the religious radicals of the 16th century.