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Paul Lay

The outbreak of the First World War, the day Washington burned and the secret history of the Panama Canal.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

West Germany's World Cup win, the final years of Elizabeth I, the July Crisis and a British genocide in Tasmania.

Our editor Paul Lay picks the books he'll be packing to the beach this summer.

The furore over Michael Gove's plans for the English curriculum shows our collective amnesia over our rich sources of literature and history, writes Paul Lay.

The winners of this year's prestigious history prize have been announced.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

Archaeologists have confirmed that the town of Amesbury in Wiltshire, located two miles from Stonehenge, is the longest continuously occupied settlement in Britain.

The cultural events planned to mark the centenary of the First World War have taken a turn for the bizarre.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

The last days of India's first prime minister, travels with the King of Siam and how the Scots invented Britishness.

Paul Lay considers the late MP's contribution to and understanding of England's radical tradition.

A recent televisual account of the First World War leaves Paul Lay feeling underwhelmed.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

Smoking in the First World War, Rome's 'tiger mother' and a historian's take on  Game of Thrones.

Historians are beginning to reengage with their discipline as a social science, a move welcomed by Paul Lay.

We speak to Calder Walton, the author of Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire.

A recap of the recent event organised by the British Library and History Today.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

A great historian of Poland and a survey of British Intelligence were among this year’s winners.

Paul Lay is impressed by the National Gallery director's dismissal of the 'numbers game' when considering the success of blockbuster art shows.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

Mark Horton tells the story of an archaeological dig that may have fuelled the fantasies of J.R.R. Tolkien

The editor offers a brief introduction to the new-look History Today

New year, new look: a preview of our January 2014 issue.

After much debate, the shortlist for this year's book prize has been decided.

In this episode of the podcast, Jacob Norris discusses the real history of Bethlehem.

Paul Lay salutes a new perspective on Britain’s involvement in the Napoleonic Wars.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

Allan Mallinson joins us to discuss a 'lost' memo penned by Winston Churchill in 1911 concerning the prospect of a European war.


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