Jump to Navigation

Political

The Editor's Choice below is free to read, but any article marked with the lock symbol requires access to our online archive

EDITOR'S CHOICE

The chain of events that led to the rule of Saddam Hussein began with the murder on July 14th, 1958 of the 23-year-old King Faisal. Antony Hornyold was a junior diplomat at the British embassy in...

Andrew Boxer demonstrates the ways in which external events affected the struggles of African Americans in the 1950s and 1960s.

Issue: 70 2011

As the Coalition government marks its first anniversary Martin Pugh sees its blend of Liberal and Conservative policies mirrored in the long and chequered career of the most famous of all 20th-century prime ministers.

Volume: 61 Issue: 5 2011

Clovis I died in Paris on November 27th 511, aged 46.

Volume: 61 Issue: 11 2011

Richard Cavendish describes Edward the Confessor's canonisation, on January 5th, 1161.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

Brazil may be one of the 21st century’s emerging superpowers, but its history is a mystery to many. Gabriel Paquette tells the story of its early years as an independent state.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Rachel Hammersley discusses how events in the 1640s and 1680s in England established a tradition that inspired French thinkers on the path to revolution a century later.

Volume: 61 Issue: 10 2011

By reinterpreting the years before 1914 William Mulligan sees the 'July Crisis' in a fresh perspective.

Issue: 69 2011

Though superb works of art in themselves, the wildlife paintings of Francis Barlow are full of rich metaphors that shed light on the anxieties and concerns of a Britain emerging from the horrors of civil war, says Nathan Flis.

Volume: 61 Issue: 7 2011

Alex von Tunzelmann reassesses a two-part article on the troubled relationship between the United States and Cuba, published in History Today 50 years ago in the wake of the Bay of Pigs invasion.

Volume: 61 Issue: 5 2011

Benjamin Zachariah helps to debunk the romantic 'Legend of the Mahatma'.

Issue: 69 2011

One hundred and fifty years after the establishment of the Kingdom of Italy, Graham Darby reassesses the contribution of one of the key players.

Issue: 70 2011

Richard Cavendish describes how General Somoza organised an armed uprising and seized power in Nicaragua, on June 9th 1936.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Ben Sandell examines the origins, influence and significance of a group of often misunderstood radicals.

Issue: 70 2011

In a reign of just 15 years Æthelstan united the English for the first time. Yet many of the facts about him remain elusive. Sarah Foot describes the challenges of writing his biography.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

What was it like to grow up in Nazi Germany in a family quietly opposed to National Socialism? Giles Milton describes one boy’s experience.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

A peace conference held in Holland in 1899 in fact ended by rewriting the laws of war, says Geoffrey Best.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

D.R. Thorpe, Macmillan's new biographer, evokes the memory of 'Supermac'.

Issue: 70 2011

Few English monarchs have such a poor reputation as Henry VI. Yet he was held in high regard by the Tudors, says Michael Hicks, despite losing the Wars of the Roses.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

The creation of the modern unified German state in January 1871 constitutes the greatest diplomatic and political achievement of any leader of the last two centuries; but it was effected at a huge personal and political price, argues Jonathan Steinberg.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

The Italian Renaissance republics are regarded by many as pioneers of good governance. Yet republican rule often resulted in chaos and it was left to strong despotic rulers to restore order, as Alexander Lee demonstrates.

Volume: 61 Issue: 7 2011

Despite their mutual loathing and suspicion, James I and his parliaments needed one another, as Andrew Thrush explains. The alternative, ultimately, was civil war.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

A monarch’s divine ability to cure scrofula was an established ritual when James I came to the English throne in 1603. Initially sceptical of the Catholic characteristics of the ceremony, the king found ways to ‘Protestantise’ it and to reflect his own hands-on approach to kingship, writes Stephen Brogan.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Outremer, the crusader kingdom, and its capital Jerusalem entered a golden age during the 1130s. Simon Sebag Montefiore portrays its extraordinary cast of kings, queens, conquerors and criminals.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

Richard Cavendish remembers King Farouk's succession to the Egyptian throne on April 28th, 1936.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Chris Corin ressurects the life of a Soviet survivor whose remarkable and significant career deserves to be better known.

Issue: 70 2011

Richard Cavendish provides an overview of the life of the French monarch who was nicknamed 'the Universal Spider'.

Volume: 61 Issue: 7 2011

Robert Pearce asks why Louis-Philippe's 'July Monarchy' was overthrown.

Issue: 71 2011

Todd Thompson describes how the relationship between a Christian missionary, nicknamed ‘Anderson of Arabia’, and a Muslim religious leader from the Italian-controlled region of Cyrenaica played a major role in the creation of modern Libya after 1945.

Volume: 61 Issue: 12 2011

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of this great emperor's accession, on March 8th, AD161.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

Mary Queen of Scots left Calais for Scotland on August 14th, 1561, aged 18 years old.

Volume: 61 Issue: 8 2011

About Us | Contact Us | Advertising | Subscriptions | Newsletter | RSS Feeds | Ebooks | Podcast | Submitting an Article
Copyright 2012 History Today Ltd. All rights reserved.