Jump to Navigation

The Great Depression in Europe, 1929-39

By Patricia Clavin | Published in History Review 2000 
Print this article   Email this article

The economic crisis which began in 1929 is often seen as the major turning point in 20th-century world history. Patricia Clavin examines its causes and effects.

Unemployed men in Scotland, 1930The modern world has never experienced an economic crisis as severe as the ‘Great Depression’. The term was first coined in the United States to describe the economic collapse that, by 1931, had shattered the US economy and Americans’ faith in the future. Europe and the rest of the world were also badly hit, and while they first called the crisis ‘a slump’, in time the label ‘Great Depression’ was adopted on both sides of the Atlantic to describe this unprecedented global economic crisis.


 This article is available to History Today online subscribers only. If you are a subscriber, please log in.

Please choose one of these options to access this article:

Call our Subscriptions department on +44 (0)20 3219 7813 for more information.

If you are logged in but still cannot access the article, please contact us



About Us | Contact Us | Advertising | Subscriptions | Newsletter | RSS Feeds | Ebooks | Podcast
Copyright 2012 History Today Ltd. All rights reserved.