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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Patricia Fara explores the scientific education of Mary Shelley and how a work of early science fiction inspired her best-known novel Frankenstein.

The Antipodean reformer died on May 16th, 1862.

Volume: 62 Issue: 5 2012

The designer of the Colt revolver, the most celebrated killing machine in the history of the Wild West, died on January 10th 1862, aged 47.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

The ancient Greek Olympics were just as enmeshed in international politics, national rivalries and commercial pressures as their modern counterpart, says David Gribble.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

Today Jane Austen is regarded as one of the greats of English literature. But it was not always so. Amanda Vickery describes the changing nature of Austen’s reception in the two centuries since her birth.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

The Zoological Society of London was launched in 1826 to promote scientific research into new species. Roger Rideout describes how it amassed its specimens for its private museum and menagerie, which soon became a public attraction.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

Ian Bradley looks at the life of Vincent Priessnitz, pioneer of hydrotherapy, whose water cures gained advocates throughout 19th-century Europe and beyond and are still popular today.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

With Italy on the brink of financial collapse and in deep political crisis, the country’s 150th anniversary has been a dramatic one. It is especially timely, then, to take stock of new research into this most contradictory and enigmatic of countries.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

Patricia Cleveland-Peck tells the story of Fanny Calderón de la Barca and her life as an author, ambassador’s wife and governess to the Spanish royal family.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

Graeme Garrard recalls Isaac Brock, the Guernsey-born army officer still celebrated in Canada for his part in defending British North America from the United States in the War of 1812.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

Richard Cavendish charts the life of the author Harriet Beecher Stowe, who was born on June 14th, 1811.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Jacqueline Riding examines how a 19th-century painting, created almost 150 years after the Jacobite defeat at Culloden, has come to dominate the iconography of that event.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Simon Lemiuex asks why the Unionists dominated British politics between 1886 and 1906.

Issue: 69 2011

Few figures in British political history have endured such lingering hostility as the statesman who did so much to forge Europe’s post-Napoleonic settlement, says John Bew.

Volume: 61 Issue: 11 2011

As China reclaims its central role in the world, Robert Bickers appeals to Britons and others in the West to take account of the legacy left by the country’s difficult 19th century.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

Glittering monument to Britain’s colonial achievement or fragile symbol of a fragmenting imperial dream? Jan Piggott charts the efforts to make Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace flourish as an ‘Acropolis of Empire’.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

The Australian pioneer Robert O'Hara Burke died of starvation on June 30th, 1861.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

The innocence of France’s Captain Dreyfus – a Jewish officer incarcerated on Devil’s Island after he was accused of spying for Germany – has long been established. But was there a real traitor? And what part did Oscar Wilde play in the murky affair? Nigel Jones investigates.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Brazil may be one of the 21st century’s emerging superpowers, but its history is a mystery to many. Gabriel Paquette tells the story of its early years as an independent state.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

One hundred and fifty years after the establishment of the Kingdom of Italy, Graham Darby reassesses the contribution of one of the key players.

Issue: 70 2011

A series of violent attacks by pale shrouded figures on lone pedestrians, especially women, was widely reported in the early 19th century. Jacob Middleton uncovers the sham ghosts of Georgian London.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Natasha McEnroe on the reopening of a fascinating but little-known collection.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

A peace conference held in Holland in 1899 in fact ended by rewriting the laws of war, says Geoffrey Best.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

Writing her first historical novel has raised some unexpected challenges for the historian Stella Tillyard.

Volume: 61 Issue: 5 2011

The creation of the modern unified German state in January 1871 constitutes the greatest diplomatic and political achievement of any leader of the last two centuries; but it was effected at a huge personal and political price, argues Jonathan Steinberg.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

James Boswell, Samuel Johnson’s future biographer, found Glasgow a dull place. Yet it was at the city’s university that he came into contact with the political economist Adam Smith, whose insights forced the student to grapple with competing claims on his conscience, as Robert Zaretsky explains.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Robert Pearce asks why Louis-Philippe's 'July Monarchy' was overthrown.

Issue: 71 2011

Richard Cavendish recreates the circumstances of Horatio Nelson's victory at Copenhagen on April 2nd, 1801.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Richard Lansdown introduces Hugh Welch Diamond, one of the fathers of medical photography, whose images of the insane both reflected and challenged prevailing ideas about visually recording insanity.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

Michael Bloch tells the story of one of the more unusual dynasties related to the Windsors.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

As Matthew Shaw demonstrates, scandal sold newspapers 200 years ago, just as it does today.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

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