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Medieval (4th-15thC)

The Editor's Choice below is free to read, but any article marked with the lock symbol requires access to our online archive

EDITOR'S CHOICE

Michael Antonucci discerns Byzantine origins in today's international power politics.

Chris Wickham revisits an article by J.B.Morrall, first published in History Today in 1959, on the strange, shortlived emperor who in the tenth century sought to rule the lands we now call Germany and Italy.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Since its discovery in Yemen in 1972 a collection of brittle documents, believed to be among the earliest Koranic texts, has been the subject of fierce and divisive debate among scholars of Islamic history, as Scott MacMillan reports.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of St Catherine of Siena's canonisation by Pope Pius II.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Janina Ramirez, presenter of a new BBC documentary on Iceland and its literature, explores the country’s sagas, their wide-ranging legacy and what they tell us about the history and culture of the Arctic island and its peoples.

Volume: 61 Issue: 5 2011

Helen Castor visits the History Today archive to find Maurice Keen's 1959 analysis of an important collection of family letters that offer an unparalleled insight into gentry life in 15th-century England.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

Hywel Williams revisits an article by Peter Munz, first published in History Today in 1959, and asks who needed whose approval most, the great ruler of the Franks or Pope Leo III?

Volume: 60 Issue: 9 2010

Richard Cavendish marks an important anniversary for one of Europe's most fantastic pieces of medieval architecture.

Volume: 60 Issue: 10 2010

In the 15th century, Cyriacus of Ancona journeyed in search of the Mediterranean’s Classical past. In so doing, he laid the groundwork for the 18th-century Grand Tour and today’s cultural holidays, as Marina Belozerskaya explains.

Volume: 60 Issue: 3 2010

The historian’s desire for certainty is hard to square with the fragility of sources and their constant reworking by the profession. Casting a cold eye on the remaining evidence relating to the deaths of Edward II and Richard II, Ian Mortimer plots a way forward for his discipline.

Volume: 60 Issue: 12 2010

Richard Cavendish remembers the death of an ill-fated medieval Scottish king, on August 3rd 1460.

Volume: 60 Issue: 8 2010

Medieval scholars were the first to make the connection between maths and science and anticipated the discovery of inertia long before Newton. So why have their discoveries been forgotten, asks James Hannam.

Volume: 60 Issue: 1 2010

The murder of a 12-year-old boy in Norwich in 1144 inspired Thomas of Monmouth, a monk from the city's cathedral, to create an anti-semitic account of the incident. His influential work reveals much about life and belief in medieval England, argues Miri Rubin.

Volume: 60 Issue: 6 2010

David Hipshon outlines the career of the most controversial king ever to have occupied the English throne.

Issue: 66 2010

Richard Cavendish remembers the events of December 30th, 1460.

Volume: 60 Issue: 12 2010

The Teutonic Knights were defeated at the Battle of Tannenberg, on July 15th, 1410.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

The Bamburgh sword, a unique pattern-welded weapon found in Northumbria, has helped shed new light on a critical period of Anglo-Saxon. 

Volume: 60 Issue: 2 2010

Anthony Pollard visits the History Today archive to examine Alan Rogers’ claim that a lack of principle among rival lords resulted in the great conflagration of 15th-century England.

Volume: 60 Issue: 5 2010

Roger Crowley finds that modern European concerns about Turkey are anticipated in an article by Bernard Lewis, first published in 1953.

Volume: 60 Issue: 2 2010

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of the founding of Switzerland's first university, at Basel, on April 4th, 1460.

Volume: 60 Issue: 4 2010

Miri Rubin explores the medieval galleries at the V&A and the British Museum.

Volume: 60 Issue: 4 2010

On August 1st, 1259, the English renewed a truce which recognised Llywelyn ap Gruffydd as Prince of Wales.

Volume: 59 Issue: 8 2009

The building of Istanbul’s new underground railway has uncovered thousands of years of history, including the first complete Byzantine naval craft ever found. Pinar Sevinclidir investigates.

Volume: 59 Issue: 7 2009

Aug 15, 1209 - Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of a great fortress being sacked.

Volume: 59 Issue: 8 2009

Lucy Wooding introduces a highly significant, but often much misunderstood, cultural force.

Issue: 64 2009

Eadwig died on October 1st, 959, still in his teens, in circumstances which remain unknown.

Volume: 59 Issue 10 2009

Richard Cavendish remembers the death of England's only pope, on September 1st, 1159.

Volume: 59 Issue 9 2009

Richard Cavendish looks back at the life of a most pious Christian saint.

Volume: 59 Issue: 4 2009

Hannes Kleineke examines the career of the first Yorkist king.

Issue: 63 2009

Henry II was fatally injured by the Count of Montgomery during a jousting tournament. He died on July 10th, 1559.

Volume: 59 Issue: 7 2009

Robert Hughes provides an Examiner's Commentary

Issue: 64 2009

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