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Hundred Years War

Series of wars (1337-1453) - including famous encounters at Sluys, Crecy, Poitiers, Agincourt, Orleans, Formigny, and Castillon - between England and France. Instigated by Edward III's claim to... read more

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EDITOR'S CHOICE

John Maddicott argues that Edward III's bid for glory in France was motivated by concerns about England's neighbours and trade as well as amour propre for his claim to the throne of...

'Philip the Fair' died at his palace at Fontainebleau on November 29th, 1314.

Volume: 64 Issue: 11 2014

Christopher Allmand examines Alain Chartier’s Le Livre des Quatre Dames, a poem written in response to the English victory at Agincourt, and asks what it can tell us about the lives of women during this chapter in the Hundred Years War.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

Derek Wilson looks at the life of a French princess, who married and helped depose an English king during a tumultuous period of Anglo-French relations that was to end in the Hundred Years War.

Volume: 62 Issue: 5 2012

During the Anglo-French conflicts that characterised the 14th century, the Oxford theologian John Wyclif challenged the  ‘un-Christian’ pursuit of war and wealth. Yet, just like anti-war protesters today, Wyclif had little influence on Parliament or the king, writes Rory Cox. 

Volume: 60 Issue: 8 2010

Beautiful, clever and determined, Yolande of Aragon was at the heart of the diplomatic and military campaigns that united 15th-century France. Margaret L. Kekewich charts her career.

Volume: 59 Issue: 1 2009

By challenging the very idea of a continuous Anglo-French medieval war Ian Mortimer reveals the remarkable complexities of a series of distinct conflicts that began with a prophecy and ended with an English dynasty seeking the approval of God.

Volume: 59 Issue 10 2009

Robert Knecht describes the shortcomings of Henry III, the last Valois king, and the circumstances that led him to become the first – but not the last – French monarch to die at the hands of one of his subjects.

2008

The succession of conflicts known as the Hundred Years War ended on October 19th, 1453, when Bordeaux surrendered, leaving Calais as the last English possession in France.

Volume: 53 Issue: 10 2003

John Maddicott argues that Edward III's bid for glory in France was motivated by concerns about England's neighbours and trade as well as amour propre for his claim to the throne of Philip of Valois.

Volume: 36 Issue: 5 1986

The Hundred Years War was fought on French soil. What effects did this have on the lives of the rural French communities?

Volume: 33 Issue: 6 1983

Patriotism, propaganda, profit - Anthony Tuck finds that these were the motives that led Englishmen to fight in France.

Volume: 33 Issue: 4 1983

The eldest son of Edward III took a decisive part in the battles of the Hundred Years’ War and was regarded as a paragon of chivalry. C.T. Allmand describes how the Black Prince, as he would become known, was his father’s chief lieutenant in Aquitaine, 1355-72.

Volume: 26 Issue: 2 1976

Harold F. Hutchison compares fact with fiction in Shakespeare’s historical dramas.

Volume: 17 Issue: 8 1967

A.H. Burne analyses the key factors that led to what would be a major victory in the Hundred Years' War.

Volume: 6 Issue: 9 1956

On its centenary, Maurice Powicke traced the history of the Lanchashire educational establishment.

1951 Volume: 1 Issue: 5

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