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Scotland

During the French Revolution, writes Tresham Lever, some political trials took place in Edinburgh for which Lord Braxfield has been intemperately denounced.

A general, a poet, a Calvinist, for almost a year Montrose, in King Charles’s name, was master of Scotland. Five years later, writes Aram Bakshian, Jr., he was hanged in Edinburgh.

What can explain the Scottish King's rash challenge to his uncle of England, Henry VIII, in 1542? In that year, writes Albert Makinson, a Scots army was destroyed on the borders of Cumberland, and James's throne passed to his daughter, Mary, before whom lay a tragic destiny.

Gladstone and his Victorian Liberals still offer a great insight into the UK's divisions.

Before discussing the possibility of Home Rule, Britain needs to get its 'House' in order, argues Naomi Lloyd-Jones.

During his brief lifetime, James V was a popular ruler who aimed to maintain Scotland’s independence and safeguard its place on the European stage. Linda Porter describes his reign and the fraught relationship between the young king and his English uncle, Henry VIII.

Scots need not look far to find a successful example of ‘devo-max’.

During the reign of Charles II and his brother, writes Tresham Lever, Mackenzie as judge and Lord Advocate at Edinburgh was involved in some highly contentious trials.

With the independence referendum just around the corner, Naomi Lloyd-Jones asks why the Scottish Home Rule Association, an important precursor of the SNP, has been largely forgotten.

The 1914-18 conflict changed the nature of Scottish identity.

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