Marlborough College Summer School

England

Early associated with midland Collieries, writes E.M. Howe, the Beaumont family later became generous patrons of art.

W.G. Hoskins' study of English surnames shows that, even before the Industrial Revolution, country families were very often on the move.

John E. Holehouse considers the factors that led to a sudden and rapid improvement in cartographic scope and technique from 1480 onward.

‘I am nearly certain that this tunnel will be made sooner or later,’ declared an expert of the eighteen-eighties. By H.S.W. Corrigan.

Since Tudor times, and for four centuries, writes Ian Bradley, the observance of the Sabbath was strictly enjoined by Government regulation.

J.F. Battick and N.C. Klimavicz describe a parliamentary dispute over Cromwell’s statue.

In 1785, writes Mary Beth Norton, a Loyalist physician from Boston made the first aerial flight across the English Channel.

Among the traditional heroes of Trades Unionism, writes Stephen Usherwood, are the six Dorset labourers who were sentenced to transportation for ‘administering illegal oaths’.

For forty years, writes D.M. Hopkinson, the eccentric Vicar of a remote parish in Cornwall led a richly combative life both in High Church politics and in literature.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.