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The Editor's Choice below is free to read, but any article marked with the lock symbol requires access to our online archive

EDITOR'S CHOICE

Henry Tudor defeated and killed Richard III in battle in August 1485. That much is certain. Colin Richmond, however, wonders how the battle was fought; what prompted Yorkists to defect to the...

Jacob Middleton finds that, far from being a relic of a cruel Victorian past, corporal punishment became more frequent and institutionalised in 20th-century England.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

The Tudor historian John Guy returns to his medieval roots to examine the true nature of the relationship between Henry II and his ‘turbulent priest’ Thomas Becket.

Volume: 62 Issue: 4 2012

Two hundred years ago Britain was gripped by a wave of violent machine breaking, as skilled textile workers, invoking the mythical Ned Ludd, attacked factories and factory owners in an attempt to defend their livelihoods. Richard Jones looks at how the phenomenon affected the industrial heartlands of Yorkshire.

Volume: 62 Issue: 5 2012

Julia Lovell reappraises Leslie Marchant’s article on the Opium Wars, first published in History Today in 2002.

Volume: 62 Issue: 6 2012

Changing sides during the British Civil Wars was more common than once thought, claims Andrew Hopper, and played an important part in determining the outcome of the conflict.

Volume: 62 Issue: 9 2012

Nicholas Mee recalls Jeremiah Horrocks, the first astronomer to observe Venus cross in front of the Sun, whose discoveries paved the way for the achievements of Isaac Newton.

Volume: 62 Issue: 6 2012

King George V and Kaiser Wilhelm II pose together in 1912. However, the Kaiser had mixed feelings towards Britain and the First World War broke out two years later.

Volume: 61 Issue: 12 2011

Decadent, effeminate, outdated, the image of the Cavalier remains that of his enemies, victorious in the Civil Wars. John Stubbs offers a rather more complex corrective view.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Stephen Alford admires a perceptive article on Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I’s ally and consummate political fixer, by the distinguished Tudor historian Joel Hurstfield, first published in the 1956 volume of History Today.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Glittering monument to Britain’s colonial achievement or fragile symbol of a fragmenting imperial dream? Jan Piggott charts the efforts to make Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace flourish as an ‘Acropolis of Empire’.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Rachel Hammersley discusses how events in the 1640s and 1680s in England established a tradition that inspired French thinkers on the path to revolution a century later.

Volume: 61 Issue: 10 2011

Gated communities may be growing in number but they are nothing new, as Michael Nelson knows from personal experience.

Volume: 61 Issue: 11 2011

In the late 18th century the merchants, manufacturers and traders of Liverpool founded one of the first chambers of commerce in Britain with the aim of promoting the local economy. Bob Bennett looks at early parallels with the Coalition government’s plans for local partnerships.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Ben Sandell examines the origins, influence and significance of a group of often misunderstood radicals.

Issue: 70 2011

In a reign of just 15 years Æthelstan united the English for the first time. Yet many of the facts about him remain elusive. Sarah Foot describes the challenges of writing his biography.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

James Whitfield on why the theft of a Spanish master’s portrait of a British military hero led to a change in the law.

Volume: 61 Issue: 8 2011

Few English monarchs have such a poor reputation as Henry VI. Yet he was held in high regard by the Tudors, says Michael Hicks, despite losing the Wars of the Roses.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

Richard Wilkinson argues against the prevailing orthodoxy.

Issue: 69 2011

A monarch’s divine ability to cure scrofula was an established ritual when James I came to the English throne in 1603. Initially sceptical of the Catholic characteristics of the ceremony, the king found ways to ‘Protestantise’ it and to reflect his own hands-on approach to kingship, writes Stephen Brogan.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

Patrick Williams reveals the courage of Henry VIII's Spanish wife.

Issue: 69 2011

Ian Bradley on the precarious past of a pure Worcestershire water.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility was first published in London by Thomas Egerton on October 30th, 1811.

Volume: 61 Issue: 10 2011

Queen Anne ordered a racecourse to be built on Ascot Heath in 1711. It was officially opened on August 11th.

Volume: 61 Issue: 8 2011

Michael Bloch tells the story of one of the more unusual dynasties related to the Windsors.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Lauren Kassell reveals how the casebooks, diaries and diagrams of the late-16th-century astrologer Simon Forman provide a unique perspective on a period when the study of the stars began to embrace modern science.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

As Matthew Shaw demonstrates, scandal sold newspapers 200 years ago, just as it does today.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

There is nothing new or exceptional about the recent English riots and they will have little long-term impact, argues Tim Stanley.

Volume: 61 Issue: 10 2011

The English diet has been mythologised as one of roasted meats and few vegetables but, as Anita Guerrini concludes from a survey of early modern writings on the subject, the nation’s approach to food has been rather more complicated than that.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

While industrialists in Manchester were busily engaged in developing the factory system, investors in London were applying its principles to the capital’s old pubs. The result was a coldly efficient business model. Jessica Warner explains how it worked and why it failed.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

An insight into the London Library's remarkable collection of early English versions of the Bible, at the heart of which is a copy of the King James Bible of 1611.

2011

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