Who's Who

London

In this scholarly but immensely readable book Matt Cook explores the domestic interiors of homosexual men at various times from the end of the...

Presided over by this difficult, capricious yet highly gifted London hostess, Holland House, wrote a contemporary diarist, became ‘the house of all Europe’. By Prudence Hannay.

The remains of the Palace were almost completely destroyed by the fire of 1834 and, writes L.W. Cowie, the Houses of Parliament were rebuilt by Sir Charles Barry.

Briefly a royal palace, writes L.W. Cowie, Bridewell became a hospital, an apprentices’ school and a reformatory for vagrants and prostitutes.

L.W. Cowie takes the reader on a visit to a city monastery, for three hundred years associated with the Dominicans and, after the Reformation, with the theatre.

Anthony Babington describes life in an eighteenth century London prison for felons, debtors and rebels.

Reginald and Jamila Massey trace the visit of an Indian to England during the eighteen-fifties, who opined the natives ‘are entirely submissive... to the commands of their superiors. Their sense of patriotism is greater than that of any nation in the world’.

From 1831 until 1907, writes Leonard W. Cowie, Exeter Hall played a vital part in the ameliorative work of believers in human betterment.

Ask a Londoner today which beasts they are nearest to and they may well reply that you are never more than six feet away from a rat. Similarly,...

Once the hall of Richard II’s palace, Westminster Hall became a centre of the British judicial system and, writes Leonard W. Cowie, a popular meeting-place for Londoners.

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