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Europe

A quarter of a century ago, when the Berlin Wall fell, there was an expectation that the Evil Empire’s colonies, no longer subjugated by the yoke...

Michael D. Biddiss profiles a British theorists's claims that all the greatest triumphs of civilization and culture were the products of race—and of a single race at that.

The crisis in Ukraine has revealed to the world the divisions that exist throughout Europe about how the Second World War is remembered. Gareth Pritchard and Desislava Gancheva look at the controversial debate around wartime collaboration.

An introduction by Geoffrey Parker on the European Witch-craze of the 16th and 17th centuries.

Stella Ghervas examines the Great Powers’ attempt to create a new European order following the defeat of Napoleon.

Success in warfare has come to depend more and more upon elaborate technical planning. Antony Brett-James describes this modern trend through the invention of new weapons and the provision and proper use of transport.

In the midst of the Napoleonic Wars, writes William Verity, the enterprising family of merchant bankers expanded their activities from Frankfurt to London and Paris.

World history is constantly being rewritten. Christopher Dawson here emphasizes the importance of the European contribution.

In 1772 partition had been declared imperative as the only means of saving Poland from anarchy; twenty-one years later, she was punished with partition for having tried to set her house in order. Here was tragic mockery indeed, writes L.R. Lewitter.

Harold Kurtz writes that the torments of a false conscience formed a secret experience that was with Talleyrand all his life.

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