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The Editor's Choice below is free to read, but any article marked with the lock symbol requires access to our online archive

EDITOR'S CHOICE

Philip Mansel explores the City of the Sultans from 1453 onwards, and finds it characterised by a vibrant multi-culturalism until the Ottoman demise of 1922.

Lucy Inglis admires Nicholas Orme’s article on medieval childhood, first published in History Today in 2001.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

Postwar Britain’s relationship with its past was laid bare in a long-running television show, argues Tim Stanley.

Volume: 63 Issue: 3 2013

The pioneer of English travel writing was born on June 7th, 1662.

Volume: 62 Issue: 6 2012

The pioneering female traveller was born on October 13th, 1862.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

Robert Colls asks what British identity is - and what it is not.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

Jonathan Downs reports on the fire last December that caused extensive damage to one of Egypt’s most important collections of historical manuscripts.

Volume: 62 Issue: 3 2012

The cityscapes of the world’s most populous nation are expanding at a bewildering rate. But China’s current embrace of urban life has deep roots in its past, as Toby Lincoln explains.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

As the democratic franchise expanded in the 19th century, British historians were eager to offer an informed view of the past to the new electorate. We need similar initiatives today, argues John Tosh.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

England has been conflated with Britain for so long that unravelling English history from that of its Celtic neighbours is a difficult task. Paul Lay considers recent histories of England and its people.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

An 18th-century ménage à trois involving the King of Denmark inspired the recent film, A Royal Affair.  Stella Tillyard considers what makes it a story for our times.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

Contemporary culture places a high premium on novelty. Armand D’Angour argues that we should consider the more balanced views about old and new found in classical Greece.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

The release this month of the 23rd Bond film, Skyfall, coincides with the 50th anniversary of James Bond’s first appearance on the silver screen. Klaus Dodds looks back on half a century of 007.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

The boxer's great victory over James J. Braddock took place on June 22nd, 1937.

Volume: 62 Issue: 6 2012

Richard Lowe-Lauri looks at the decline of bull running in the English town of Stamford.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

From Captain Cook to playboy Prince Bertie, Tessa Dunlop examines the appeal of the tattoo among high society.

Volume: 62 Issue: 6 2012

A classic children's book was born on July 4th, 1862.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

Roger Hudson on the circumstances behind an eviction in County Clare, Ireland, photographed in July 1888.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

J.L. Laynesmith unravels one of the mysteries of the Bayeux Tapestry.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

Fundamentalism has become the face of Islam in the West. It was not always so and need not be in the future, says Tim Stanley.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

God's general was buried on August 29th, 1912.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

Helen Szamuely explores the unprecedented success of a household manual and cookery book produced by a Russian housewife, Yelena Molokhovets, following the Emancipation of the Serfs in 1861.

Volume: 62 Issue: 12 2012

Richard Almond has trawled medieval and Renaissance sources for insights about ladies’ riding habits in the Middle Ages and what they reveal about a woman’s place in that society.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

Onyeka explores the changing meanings of words for Africans in Tudor England.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

In 1729 a young entrepreneur, Jonathan Tyers, took over the failing management of the pleasure gardens at Vauxhall. During his long tenure he was able to make it a resounding success, as David Coke  explains.

Volume: 62 Issue: 5 2012

The fools of the early Tudor court were likely to have been people with learning disabilities as a new project demonstrates, says Suzannah Lipscomb.

Volume: 61 Issue: 8 2011

Medieval knights were the sporting superstars and military heroes of their day, who performed before an adoring public in the tournament. Nigel Saul explains their appeal.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Glittering monument to Britain’s colonial achievement or fragile symbol of a fragmenting imperial dream? Jan Piggott charts the efforts to make Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace flourish as an ‘Acropolis of Empire’.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

In writing a young person’s history of Britain Patrick Dillon found himself wondering where myth ends and history begins.

Volume: 61 Issue: 1 2011

History Today was launched in 1951, the year of the Festival of Britain. Barry Turner challenges Arthur Marwick’s impressions, first published in 1991, of the year that austerity Britain glimpsed a brighter future.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

A series of violent attacks by pale shrouded figures on lone pedestrians, especially women, was widely reported in the early 19th century. Jacob Middleton uncovers the sham ghosts of Georgian London.

Volume: 61 Issue: 2 2011

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