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This Month's Magazine

    

In the November edition of History Today, Charles Freeman, in a remarkable piece of historical detective work, reveals the truth about the origins of the Shroud of Turin.

Also in this issue:

  • Matt Carr asks if General Sherman, the great American Civil War general, invented Total War with his March to the Sea in 1864;
  • Daniel E. Thiery asks how much influence religion had on Henry V’s actions at the Siege of Rouen in 1418;

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Main Features

According to western stereotype, the Japanese at the time of the Second World War were passive and obedient automatons. Yet the realities of daily life in imperial Japan were complex and politically charged, argues Christopher Harding.

Charles Freeman, surprised by the lack of research into one of the great unsolved mysteries, reveals for the first time his groundbreaking examination into the creation of the venerated object.

Larry Hannant describes a forgotten episode of conflict over immigration and race between two bastions of the British Empire, Canada and India, in the summer of 1914.

The late 17th century saw the arrival of a new way of buying and selling books. Amy Bowles explores the impact of the book auction on those with a commercial and scholarly interest in the printed word.

Mira Bar-Hillel recalls the family friend who was once one of the controllers of the Zionist organisation responsible for the assassination of Britain’s minister resident in the Middle East.

‘War is an uncivil game and can’t be civilised’, said one Union sergeant of General Sherman’s rampage through Georgia in 1864. Matt Carr discusses this turning point in the American Civil War and the historical legacy of the man behind it.

The siege of Rouen in 1418 was a brutal episode of medieval warfare, made worse by the fact that the city’s elderly and infirm were abandoned to a no man’s land. Daniel E. Thiery explains how the medieval mind justified such actions.

Other articles

Faisal al Saud became ruler on November 2nd, 1964

'Philip the Fair' died at his palace at Fontainebleau on November 29th, 1314.

Daniel Snowman asks whether historical biography can be considered a serious contribution to history and assesses the latest trends in the field.

Jerome de Groot rounds up recent releases.

Roger Hudson examines a photograph of 1867, which shows the construction of one of the glories of Victorian architecture.

Historians and literary scholars should be encouraged to share their insights in order to paint a more complete picture of the past, argues Mathew Lyons.

Helen Castor asks if a medical diagnosis for Joan of Arc’s ‘visions’, first proposed in History Today in 1958, neglects the role of religion, all pervasive in the enchanted world of the Middle Ages.

Antoine-Joseph Sax was born on November 6th, 1814.


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