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This Month's Magazine

    

In the October edition of History Today, Linda Porter looks at the short but distinguished rule of James V of Scotland, who clashed with his English uncle, Henry VIII, in his fight for an independent, outward-looking Scotland.

Also in this issue:

  • Tim Stanley argues that the Hays Code, a form of self-censorship accepted by the Hollywood studios in the golden age of film, nourished rather than hampered creativity;
  • Zareer Masani examines the rise of Tata, the small family company founded by Parsis in Bombay, which is now one of the world’s largest industrial conglomerates;

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History Matters

Scots need not look far to find a successful example of ‘devo-max’.

The opening battle of the First World War was won by the Bank of England before the British had so much as fired a shot.

Main Features

On the Restoration, Charles II pardoned the many supporters of Cromwell’s Protectorate, with the exception of those directly involved in the execution of his father. These men now found their lives to be at great risk and several fled the country, as Charles Spencer explains.

During his brief lifetime, James V was a popular ruler who aimed to maintain Scotland’s independence and safeguard its place on the European stage. Linda Porter describes his reign and the fraught relationship between the young king and his English uncle, Henry VIII.

Alarm about moral degeneracy and ‘family values’ provoked Hollywood to instigate its own self-censorship codes in the 1920s. But much more than prudery underpinned their lasting impact, says Tim Stanley.

Tata is one of the world’s wealthiest conglomerates, with an especially strong presence in Britain. Zareer Masani traces its origins among the Parsis of Bombay and charts its fortunes in an independent India.

Describing the First World War as ‘an engineers’ war’, which required ‘arms more than men’, Lloyd George acted on the urgent need to employ women in the armaments industries. Henrietta Heald explains how they in turn responded to the challenges.

Alexios Alecou explains how Britain sought to police the strategically important island in the eastern Mediterranean.

Other articles

Roger Hudson visits the Belfast shipyard in 1911, where the Titanic and her sister ships, Britannic and Olympic were constructed.

Stephen Cooper admires an article from 1967 that sought to separate historical fact from fiction in Shakespeare’s portrayal of England’s much mythologised warrior king.

Stockings were an instant hit when they were first sold on October 27th 1939.

Are historians inevitably faced with a choice between academic analysis or popular narrative, or should they aim to master both skills, asks Suzannah Lipscomb.

The artist died on October 26th, 1764.


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