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Afghanistan

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EDITOR'S CHOICE

'Monumentally bad diplomacy, worse strategy, chaotic military organisation and inept generalship' - Thomas Tulenko describes how great powers have failed in their attacks on Afghanistan. Penned as...

Roger Hudson explains a photographic panorama, taken at the beginning of the Second Afghan War, of the ancient and forbidding fortress of Bala Hissar.

Volume: 64 Issue: 2 2014

The recent killing of British soldiers by their Afghan allies echoes events of the 19th century, writes Rob Johnson.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

David Loyn, the only reporter with the Taliban when they took Kabul in 1996, takes issue with military historian Thomas Tulenko’s analysis of Britain’s 19th-century invasions of Afghanistan, first published in June 1980.

Volume: 59 Issue: 12 2009

Continuing his series on how cartoonists have seen events great and small, Mark Bryant looks at the coverage of one of ‘Victoria’s little wars’.

Volume: 57 Issue: 11 2007

Roland Quinault discusses Gladstone’s view of the Second Afghan War both in opposition and during his premiership.

Volume: 52 Issue: 12 2002

Sebastian Balfour recalls the use and effects of chemical warfare during, and after, the early decades of the twentieth century.

Volume: 52 Issue: 6 2002

Bruce Collins considers the mixture of adventurism, disaster, and lethal reprisal that marked British activities in Afghanistan under Victoria

Volume: 51 Issue: 12 2001

'Monumentally bad diplomacy, worse strategy, chaotic military organisation and inept generalship' - Thomas Tulenko describes how great powers have failed in their attacks on Afghanistan. Penned as Soviet tanks rolled into Kabul in December 1979, the BBC's David Loyn offered his own analysis thirty years later.

Volume: 30 Issue: 6 1980

J.M. Brereton introduces Pierre Louis Napolean Cavagnari, a soldier of French-Italian and Irish descent, who played a distinguished part in British relations with Afghanistan, eventually costing him his life.

Volume: 29 Issue: 6 1979

Gerald Morgan introduces Byron’s friend and executor; a radical Whig and head of the East India Company during the Afghan troubles of 1835-43.

Volume: 28 Issue: 10 1978

Raymond A. Mohl describs how the nineteenth century history of Anglo-Russian conflict in Central Asia is marked by gradual Russian advances and gradual British retreats.

Volume: 19 Issue: 3 1969

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