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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Patricia Fara explores the scientific education of Mary Shelley and how a work of early science fiction inspired her best-known novel Frankenstein.

The playwright was baptised on February 26th, 1564.

Volume: 64 Issue: 2 2014

The great poet passed away aged 73 on January 28th, 1939.

Volume: 64 Issue: 1 2014

Jerome de Groot considers recent releases.

Volume: 64 Issue: 2 2014

Jerome de Groot casts his eye over a selection of recent releases.

Volume: 64 Issue: 7 2014

Historians and literary scholars should be encouraged to share their insights in order to paint a more complete picture of the past, argues Mathew Lyons.

Volume: 64 Issue: 11 2014

Justin Marozzi admires Hugh Kennedy’s article from 2004, which offers a nuanced portrait of the great Abbasid caliph, Harun al Rashid, much-mythologised hero of The Arabian Nights

Volume: 64 Issue: 7 2014

Did the story of a stolen Roman ring provide the basis for one of the 20th century’s most popular works of fiction? Mark Horton and Lynn Forest-Hill tell the story of the archaeological dig which  fuelled the fantasies of J.R.R. Tolkien.

Volume: 64 Issue: 1 2014

On the centenary of his birth, Martin Evans looks at the evolving legacy of the Algerian-born French writer Albert Camus

Volume: 63 Issue: 11 2013

One of the strangest literary figures of his time died on June 17th, 1963.

Volume: 63 Issue: 6 2013

The bibliophile and founder of the Bodleian Library died on January 29th, 1613.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

In the latest of his occasional surveys of historical fiction, Jerome de Groot casts a critical eye on the often disparaged genre of romance.

Volume: 63 Issue: 5 2013

The French poet was ordered to leave his city on January 3rd, 1463.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

In our latest survey of historical fiction Jerome de Groot finds a remarkable breadth of books that address our need for present-day certainties to confound the chaos of the past – and revisits a timeless classic.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

Proust's epic first appeared on November 14th, 1913.

Volume: 63 Issue: 11 2013

The Vikings are back with a vengeance, writes Jeffrey Richards

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

The poet was appointed on July 16th, 1913.

Volume: 63 Issue: 7 2013

Crispin Andrews finds echoes of one of Sherlock Holmes’ most celebrated mysteries in a tale of 18th-century France.

Volume: 63 Issue: 7 2013

Sean McGlynn reconsiders the origins of the popular myth and suggests a new contender for the original folk hero; not an outlaw from Nottingham but a devoted royal servant from Kent, who opposed the French invasion against King John in 1216.

Volume: 63 Issue: 3 2013

Lord Byron’s death there in April 1824 created an enduring legend. But the real story of the poet’s mission to help Greece in its revolution against Ottoman Turkish rule is one of hard-headed politics, which goes straight to the heart of the country’s present-day crisis, says Roderick Beaton.

Volume: 63 Issue: 6 2013

Christopher Allmand examines Alain Chartier’s Le Livre des Quatre Dames, a poem written in response to the English victory at Agincourt, and asks what it can tell us about the lives of women during this chapter in the Hundred Years War.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

Jerome de Groot wades through the swathes of warriors landing on his desk to give us a round-up of the best battle-laden historical fiction for this year.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

The poets Gerard Manley Hopkins and Coventry Patmore both subscribed to a Tory world view, fiercely opposing the reforms of Prime Minister Gladstone. But their correspondence reveals two very different personalities, says Gerald Roberts.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

Today Jane Austen is regarded as one of the greats of English literature. But it was not always so. Amanda Vickery describes the changing nature of Austen’s reception in the two centuries since her birth.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

The romantic ‘braveheart’ image of Scotland’s past lives on. But, as Christopher A. Whatley shows, a more nuanced ‘portrait of the nation’ is emerging, one that explores the political and religious complexities of Jacobitism and its enduring myth-making power.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a masterpiece of Middle English literature, which narrowly escaped destruction in the 18th century. Nicholas Mee examines the poem to discover both its secret benefactor and the location in which its drama unfolds.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

Geoffrey Best reflects on a lifetime collecting books and the difficulties – emotional and financial – of parting with them.

Volume: 62 Issue: 12 2012

A classic children's book was born on July 4th, 1862.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

A landmark in folklore was published on December 20th, 1812.

Volume: 62 Issue: 12 2012

Richard Cavendish charts the life of the author Harriet Beecher Stowe, who was born on June 14th, 1811.

Volume: 61 Issue: 6 2011

Though it is immersed in the theological ideas of the Middle Ages, the cosmology of Dante’s Divine Comedy is sophisticated, sceptical and tolerant, argues James Burge.

Volume: 61 Issue: 3 2011

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