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Among the traditional heroes of Trades Unionism, writes Stephen Usherwood, are the six Dorset labourers who were sentenced to transportation for ‘administering illegal oaths’.

At a moment in British life when official policy on prices and incomes is troubling many devoted Socialists, the Trades Union Congress celebrates its centenary, writes Patrick Renshaw.

If there are turning points in history, the Repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846, and the adoption of Free Trade, represented such a moment in Britain. By peaceful means, writes W.H. Chaloner, the new industrial forces in the nation had triumphed over the old landed interests.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.

Bernhard W. Scholz describes how the burghers of Laon in 1112 set a violent example of twelfth-century revolt against established authority.

Was one of Europe's finest hotels occupied by members of the English working class during the interwar years?

Parliament initially became troubled by the working classes 'thundering at the gates'. Curiously, writes Paul Adelman, it was the Conservative Party that benefited from Russell’s Reform Act.

During an industrial conflict that lasted five weeks and brought the Port of London to a standstill, writes R.B. Oram, the “close fraternity of the docks” struck for better working conditions and more generous rates of pay.

The problems of the interwar mining industry, which led to a General Strike in 1926, writes W.H. Chaloner, epitomized the struggle between capital and labour in twentieth-century Britain.

During over half a century, writes W.J. Fishman, Blanqui virtually personified the revolutionary movement in nineteenth-century France.

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