Manchester Metropolitan University

Social Classes

Much has been written about the increase in consumption and the growing richness of material life and culture that accompanied the process of...

Emma Griffin charts the postwar emergence of working-class history as a scholarly discipline and argues that, thanks to the torch-bearers, the rationale for it has ebbed away.

R.J. White analyses the events of the “Derbyshire Insurrection” - otherwise known as the Pentrich Revolution - as an example of local history in its bearing on national history.

Among the traditional heroes of Trades Unionism, writes Stephen Usherwood, are the six Dorset labourers who were sentenced to transportation for ‘administering illegal oaths’.

At a moment in British life when official policy on prices and incomes is troubling many devoted Socialists, the Trades Union Congress celebrates its centenary, writes Patrick Renshaw.

If there are turning points in history, the Repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846, and the adoption of Free Trade, represented such a moment in Britain. By peaceful means, writes W.H. Chaloner, the new industrial forces in the nation had triumphed over the old landed interests.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.

Bernhard W. Scholz describes how the burghers of Laon in 1112 set a violent example of twelfth-century revolt against established authority.

Was one of Europe's finest hotels occupied by members of the English working class during the interwar years?

Parliament initially became troubled by the working classes 'thundering at the gates'. Curiously, writes Paul Adelman, it was the Conservative Party that benefited from Russell’s Reform Act.

X

Subscribe

June issue

In Print

Online

The App