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James Christie first held his eponymous auction on December 5th, 1766.

Jan Plamper opens The History of Emotions with a visit to an anatomy room. His research on the history of fear among soldiers had led him...

A family planning clinic opened in New York on October 16th, 1916. It lasted only a few days.

Gretchen E. Henderson approaches her topic through an impressive number of examples, spanning disciplines, mediums, usages, geographies and...

The Boy Scout movement produced a little-known offshoot of ‘intellectual Barbarians’, whose charismatic leader had dreams of overcoming the existential crises of the 20th century.

During the 1950s and 1960s, debates over the legality and morality of homosexuality drove gay men and doctors to desperate and dangerous measures in their search for a ‘cure’, writes John-Pierre Joyce.

Edward L. Bernays’ ability to mould public desire made him one of the 20th century’s most influential – yet invisible – characters, as Iris Mostegel reveals.

Since their arrival in Britain around 500 years ago, Gypsies have created a rich tapestry of romantic folklore. Yet, argues Jeremy Harte, this aspect of their past has been almost completely ignored by academic historians.

England’s legal system, which has since spread beyond its country of origin, resulted from an uncommon combination of centuries of input from a wide variety of sources. Harry Potter traces its roots and follows its branches.

The popularity of Goethe’s novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther, was blamed for a spate of suicides. Frank Furedi argues that it set a trend for manufactured outrage that is with us still.