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Laughing at experts is nothing new. Kate Davison explores our long history of puncturing the powerful with satire and humour – to keep them in line and just for the fun of it.  

Volunteer rationing in the First World War depended on patriotism, but that could only go so far.

How Thomas Browne did battle with fake news in the 17th century.

The world does not influence Britain’s native culture, the world is its culture, as anyone with a grasp of the country’s history will understand, argues Suzannah Lipscomb.

James Christie first held his eponymous auction on December 5th, 1766.

Jan Plamper opens The History of Emotions with a visit to an anatomy room. His research on the history of fear among soldiers had led him...

A family planning clinic opened in New York on October 16th, 1916. It lasted only a few days.

Gretchen E. Henderson approaches her topic through an impressive number of examples, spanning disciplines, mediums, usages, geographies and...

The Boy Scout movement produced a little-known offshoot of ‘intellectual Barbarians’, whose charismatic leader had dreams of overcoming the existential crises of the 20th century.

During the 1950s and 1960s, debates over the legality and morality of homosexuality drove gay men and doctors to desperate and dangerous measures in their search for a ‘cure’, writes John-Pierre Joyce.